UFC workout video – Paul Kelly

Ultimate fighters: the long road to be a champion

UFC workout video - Paul Kelly

There is no single ingredient that determines a successful Ultimate Fighting Championship practitioner. The trick, say exponents of mixed martial arts (MMA), is building a well-rounded game.

A fighter braving the UFC's Octagon needs options.

While mastering a variety of disciplines is imperative, brains an attribute not generally bestowed on those who willingly earn their crust inside the bloody confines of a wire-walled cage must dovetail with brawn.

There is one inherent characteristic that drives fighters beyond their physical capabilities, one factor that often makes the difference between winning and losing. It is the base necessity that determines whether a fighter makes it to the top or withers under the strain.

The key requirement, the building block in every successful fighter's DNA, is heart. “As a coach, heart is the one thing you can't teach a fighter.

Technically you can bring people along but heart is a special thing that can't be taught,” said Shawn Tompkins, a former UFC fighter turned head trainer for TapouT, the MMA clothing range who operate a chain of training centres in America.

A fighter's courage comes to the fore long before he encounters the UFC cage. Prior to reaching the pinnacle of the sport, replete with its eight-sided treasure trove of around-the-waist gold, sacrifices must be made. Sometimes the hard choices span decades.

Always they aid the dream. Things, however, are changing. Financial incentives in the UFC, an arena that exudes glamour and gore in equal measures, are higher than ever before. Cash, according to Tompkins, remains king.

“The beauty of MMA is that there are a lot of different roads to take to become elite. But there is a huge misconception when people watch the UFC that these fighters are millionaires, living the life and rolling around in a Mercedes Benz.

It's really not that, especially for the guys at the bottom level.”

The vast percentage of the lower rung fighters who beef up UFC bills but more often than not remain unseen by the global TV audience struggle day-to-day.

While the organisers of tonight's UFC 112: Invincible in Abu Dhabi boast that the event will be broadcast in 130 countries, covering some half a billion homes and reaching one-and-a-half billion bloodthirsty fans, it is the sacrifices of the show's fighters that provide genuine human interest.

Most come from distinctly working-class backgrounds. Financial rewards aside, the majority have had to work and hard for their chance.

With ground-and-pound spoils blinding their reality-deprived eyes, fighters have, historically, supplemented their fight purses with regular day jobs. The fighters, generally, are muscle-ripped combatants plying unwanted trades to smooth fiscal burdens.

“I did whatever I could to get by,” says the English fighter Paul Taylor. “I even put off moving my parents' house until I was 22 just so I could keep doing what I loved.

“There are lots of odd-jobs I've done to make ends meet. I was a fibre-glass laminator, a labourer, builder, tiler, I'm just about a qualified carpenter. I did pretty much anything that involved manual labour, I was even a butcher.

” It is not just the up-and-coming fighters that have held down nine-to-fives.

Even the UFC's undisputed middleweight champion Anderson Silva, a Brazilian mixed martial artist who many of the sport's observers claim is the world's best pound-for-pound fighter, was not exempt from shift work in his early days.

“We've all done it,” he said. “I worked in McDonald's, had office jobs. You do what you have to.

” The idea of the planet's most lethal MMA fighter flipping burgers may seem surreal, but very few fighters find hurdleless paths to main event bouts.

“Once you get to a certain level you have to make the sacrifices,” says Terry Etim, who faces Brazil's Rafael dos Santos in a lightweight fight tonight.

“You have to decide what you want to be. Do you want to work and do it as a hobby, or do you want to take it seriously and compete with the best people in the world? It's tough at the top, you have to take it serious.” Etim's fellow Liverpudlian, Paul Kelly, concurred.

“Before I signed up for the UFC, times weren't the best and I had to do what I had to get by,” he said.

“At times, I was working seven hours a day, working on cars with my dad, but after I had my first fight and he raised my hand even if I was never intending to make the UFC I just enjoyed the sport and fighting. That was what got me through.”

Kelly's story is common on the opposite side of the Atlantic. “I had to work jobs I didn't want to work just to suit my training times,” says Kendall Grove, who won series three of Ultimate Fighter, the UFC's reality TV show.

“At times I didn't have money to eat and lived at the gym, paying my dues by mopping the mats and cleaning up.

But with great sacrifices come great success and if you're not willing to sacrifice the finer things in life, you're not going to make it.”

Taylor's opponent at Yas Island tonight, the American John Gunderson, recalled similar experiences. “The sacrifices I have made have helped me get where I am today,” the Oregon-born fighter said.

“I was building bridges at the time when I decided to turn pro and was making good money, but there was a point when I either had to do something with it or retire.

” Despite spending up to 50 hours a week in the gym, Gunderson, many regulars, is yet to commit permanently to being a full-time fighter. The main reason: money.

“I still have my day job, I work at a gym as a personal trainer,” he said. “I have a family and we to buy nice things. The majority of fighters probably don't have day jobs.

Most of them are single guys living with room-mates, buddies or sleeping on someone's couch.” Gunderson's spur, much countless others, is his passion for MMA.

“Every man wants to have his legacy, I want my fighting career to be mine,” he said. “I want it to be something I can look back at and be proud of.”

Not every path is so complicated. Sometimes, a fighter's journey to global appreciation is mapped. Take Frankie Edgar, who challenges lightweight champion BJ Penn on the UFC 112 card.

“I graduated college and was fighting on a local circuit,” he said. “I was a plumber and would get up at six in the morning to go to work. Usually I'd leave a little early, go coach high school wrestling and then train.

I probably got home after nine at night, went to bed and got up to do it all over again.

“It was tough, I had a condominium I had to support and I was getting married. I got a UFC contract but it wasn't enough and I was still working as a plumber after my first three UFC fights.” Good things, however, come to those who wait.

Edgar believes the current crop of UFC hopefuls are no better off than his generation. “Finally, when I started making enough money, then I could do MMA full-time.

A lot of guys are entering the UFC right college now and they don't typically have as many bills,” he said.

“They're going straight into fighting and it supports them. The contracts are getting bigger and they can do that. It's not easier for the new guys, though. The sport has grown and the competition is better. Ups and downs go hand-in-hand.

” For every UFC fighter who has grafted his route into the mainstream franchise, there are others who have found the path more straightforward. “I never had to hold down a full-time job,” said Matt Hughes, a two-time UFC welterweight champion who faces Brazil's Renzo Gracie tonight.

“I lived with my manager for more than a year, surviving off my fight money, my purses I fought a lot in Japan and other places but never took a job.

“I would rather have cut out something else and stayed in the gym than take a job. My night-time was for sleep, I didn't want a bar job. I was dedicated to getting as good as I could and eventually I won the world title. After that I was making enough money to do whatever I wanted.

“I would say that now that I'm past the financial burdens. My big sacrifices are my kids; I have four children and leaving them is horrible. It's tough being away from my family. In this game, the sacrifices are constant, they just change.

But I'm not complaining, every profession has its sacrifices; leaving my family is mine.”

As Penn, Hughes and Gracie know, other fight options exist. Etim is adamant that every fighter eyes the UFC. “There are a few other organisations that are paying good wages, but it's not just about the money. The UFC is where everyone wants to be,” Etim said.

“It is the main organisation, the biggest in the world and when you're starting off – even if you're a long way off – it's where you are going to want to fight.

It's the Premier League, or Champions League, in football – it's where people want to be.”

Even being on the undercard has its rewards. “This is my day job,” Taylor said. “Being on the undercard, plodding along, getting regular pay cheques, paying my mortgage every month and enjoying what I'm doing.

That's all that concerns me.” Money, as in most walks of life, dictates. “Before the UFC I was getting US$500 (Dh1,836) a fight and I had to give 150 of that to my manager,” Kelly said.

“I had three fights in 21 days at one point, but now I try to be as vicious as I can.”

That viciousness does not, however, mean Kelly is aiming for the main card. “Once you're at the top it's all about staying there, which is harder than getting there,” he said. “You get rappers and singers and whatever else but I wouldn't change my life for anything else, it's the best job in the world.

” All that said, the final word as to what drives a fighter's psyche goes to Tompkins. “People have to understand that what we do at the end of the day is fight, and if you're not prepared to do that and be good at it, you're in the wrong business,” he said. “I'll all about throwing fists, punches, kicks and being as bad as you can be.

It's a fight, don't forget that.”

emegson@thenational.ae

Updated: April 10, 2010 04:00 AM

Source: https://www.thenational.ae/sport/ultimate-fighters-the-long-road-to-be-a-champion-1.548644

Paul Kelly rebuilds life in MMA to become UFC contender

UFC workout video - Paul Kelly

There are those who say the 23-year-old should not even be in the UFC, yet it is testament to his physical resilience that he has found his way into the sport almost through the backdoor, as a sparring partner for some of the biggest names in the sport, including Michael Bisping and Quinton 'Rampage' Jackson.

Aged 12, the tearaway kid Kelly – “my dad had gone away, my mum was not able to control me”- was messing about on a motorbike with his mates along a railway line in West Derby, Liverpool. It was getting dark. “I thought I knew it all,” explains Kelly, built with the frame of a rugby union hooker.

“We were out all day and all night on the bike on the railway sidings. Of course, we shouldn't have been there. As it was getting dark, I hit a stack of wet leaves at 40 miles an hour and went into a huge concrete block on the sidings. My leg just exploded. It was a mass of blood, bone and muscle.

Kelly had smashed his femur, requiring 800 stitches, several operations, and 13 skin grafts. Even after rebuilding operations, Kelly was told by doctors that he would never walk again. “I grew up a lot that day, aged 12. It felt the world had caved in on me.”

In traction for six months, followed by 18 months of physiotherapy and rehabilitation, Kelly, literally, found his feet again. “They were telling me the whole time I would not walk again, that I'd never bend my knee again – but I wouldn't accept it. I just made my body recover through strength training.”

Kelly was unhappy when he returned to school, intent on rebuilding himself physically. “I was terrible. I was expelled, difficult in class, though I always got on with my PE teachers and my art teachers. People were forever trying to get me to come and play rugby.

” At 15, school was over for him.

He went from job to job, working in a second hand shop, stacking shelves at Costco, factory work, until, aged 19, he found a role in the place where Bisping trains, under owner Anthony McGann, as a sparring partner for professional mixed martial artists.

“I just starting training, sparring with the pro fighters. I got taken apart day after day. Gradually, though, I went from getting beaten up as a punch bag, to a respected sparring partner in the gym.

” Fighting is in his blood, in the Kelly line. “My entire family, father, uncles, grandfather, were all amateur boxers.

My dad Edward Kelly got to the ABA finals, as did my uncle Gary, who had over 80 amateur fights.

“I'm not the best technical fighter in the gym with some of the best in the world there now in Michael Bisping and Rampage Jackson. But I the actual fight. I wish people knew how hard we work. I'd mixed martial arts to be recognised as a sport around the world. It has grown as a sport in the last few years.

“I don't think people realise how hard we work as athletes. I train for 15 weeks before a fight, seven hours a day. I run and swim in the mornings, do gym work and three sparring a day. I sleep for an hour in a day, go back to the gym for another long session of sparring, and then end the day with a crazy weight and cardio circuit.”

Kelly has a four-fight deal with the UFC. His break came in January, in Newcastle, against fellow Briton Paul Taylor. UFC commentator Joe Rogan called the first round of their contest “the most exhilarating five-minute opener to a fight the sport had seen”.

Kelly was made up. In Birmingham, Kelly fights Marcus Davis, an American lightweight, who is a top-ten ranked fighter. “It's a win-win situation, I can't really lose. But if I do defeat Marcus, it will put a statement out there to the Americans that I can go somewhere in this sport.

  • UFC 89 is live on Setanta Sports on Oct 18

Source: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/sport/othersports/boxing/3166518/Paul-Kelly-rebuilds-life-in-MMA-to-become-UFC-contender-MMA.html

Marcus Davis blog

UFC workout video - Paul Kelly

Adopted Briton Marcus Davis, 'The Irish Hand Grenade', is coming off a decision loss to Mike Swick at UFC 85 in July, the first loss in 11 fights for the former Ultimate Fighter contestant.

Despite the defeat, Davis still remains in the 170-pound title hunt and a win against Kelly is critical if he wants to stay among the top players in a crowded welterweight division.

Kelly is the undefeated Englishman based Mike Bisping's Wolfslair gym. He was victorious in his Octagon debut, out-pointing fellow countryman Paul Taylor at UFC 80 earlier this year.

Marcus will be keeping Eurosport-Yahoo! up-to-date with his preparations and thoughts in the build up to what should be a superb fight.

“When I took up fighting as an eight-year-old, I didn”t do so because I wanted to be rich or famous, or because I was thinking about belts and titles and stuff that.

My mom said as a kid I was always running around punching and kicking something. I always wanted to be fighter, from as far back as I can remember – but the reason was never because there was someone on TV that I looked up to and wanted to be .

I fight to fight. Always have. I enjoy it, and that's where my passion is. I am not someone who is obsessed with rankings and ratings and where the UFC see me in terms of the top 10 in the welterweight division.

But, of course, I have a family and four children and I want to be able to take care of them and leave something for them. It is important to me to get the big fights and the big pay-days, because it will mean I am taking care of my family.

But I am not the sort of guy who would need a belt around my waist to be happy as a fighter.

As long as people view me as someone who gives it their all, goes out to entertain their fans and stays in the upper tier of UFC fighters, that's enough for me.

Where the UFC have me in terms of the welterweight division right now, I have no idea. They fixed me up last fight with Mike Swick, who was one of their top guys at 185lbs, and I lost narrowly to him even though my injury meant I was basically only fighting with one arm.

I think I am dangerous to all the fighters in the welterweight division – Georges St Pierre included. I would go into a fight with GSP knowing that he was going to absolutely dominate me on the ground. I mean, he is so far ahead of me there. The guy is built a gymnast; he can move his body in ways and at speeds that I just can't physically match.

I would have to go in there to knock him out. There would just be no other way of me winning that fight. He would have so many more opportunities to beat me than I would have to beat him; he could submit me, win a decision, ground and pound, out-grapple me. No question.

But Matt Serra went in there and proved that he isn't some sort of Superman. People discredited Serra for what he did, but a knock-out is a knock-out – and I would go into a fight with GSP believing I could do the same.

In terms of the fighters below GSP in the rankings, I would also consider myself dangerous to them. Josh Koschek would be a difficult fight for me on the ground, but Josh is a training partner of Mike Swick and his stand-up isn't as good as Swick's. I would be confident of knocking him out.

Thiago Alves and I have fought before [in the Hardcore Fighting Championships] back in 2003. I lost that fight on a split-decision and people that saw that fight said it was the best they have ever seen; he and I match-up really well.

MMA is all about the match-up. Just because Fighter A can beat Fighter B, and Fighter B can beat Fighter C, doesn't mean that Fighter C can't beat Fighter A. MMA mathematics doesn't always add up that.

But for me to get a match-up against a Koscheck or an Alves or a Diego Sanchez, I have got to get back to winning fights. I was on an 11-fight streak before I lost to Swick; I have got to get back on that sort of streak, keep beating the guy the UFC put in front of me, beat Swick again and basically make it impossible for them to ignore me.

I have to bide my time, win every single fight I have. I still have my eye on what happens at the top of the rankings, though. GSP v BJ Penn is going to be one hell of a fight and I am all for it. I'm a huge BJ Penn fan; he is one of the top two fighters in the world for me, pound-for-pound.

It's definitely a fight that should happen. We have two guys who have proved themselves the best in their divisions; they have shown that over the last couple of years.

And, for me, BJ is a better welterweight than anyone else in our division, so why not make the fight? If BJ doesn't win, he goes back to 155 and re-establishes himself there.

If he does win, then we all stand in line for a shot at taking the belt off him.

In terms of my own fight against Paul Kelly, training has been going great this week. I have been doing two or three sessions a day. Pad work with Mark DellaGrotte, reinforcing the plan we have worked out for Paul.

I am working with my strength coach Garth Crane three days a week, making me more limber and working on muscle strength rather than power, which is where I went wrong with the weightlifting before my previous fight.

I have also been sparring with some really tough guys, doing some great sessions with wrestlers, working on my take-down defence and getting up from the ground.

The plan is to look at where Paul has his strengths and then take them away from him. If he can't keep me on my back, then he is going to have to stand in front of me. And if he does that, I am going to punch holes in him.

Until next week…”

Marcus was speaking to Alex Sharratt. UFC 89 from the NIA in Birmingham will be live on Setanta Sports 8pm October 18.

Source: https://www.eurosport.com/mixed-martial-arts/marcus-davis-blog_sto1709565/story.shtml

Why is Donald Cerrone called Cowboy and how many UFC fights has he won?

UFC workout video - Paul Kelly

THE UFC just wouldn't be the same without Donald 'Cowboy' Cerrone.

A former professional kickboxer and 50-fight MMA veteran, the Denver native has been active in mixed-martial arts and cage fighting for almost twenty years.

Donald Cerrone admitted he will throw up with nerves before fighting Conor McGregorCredit: AP:Associated Press

Cerrone holds the record for the most wins in UFC history, as well as the most bouts and takedowns since the organisation begin in 1993.

Why is Donald Cerrone called Cowboy?

COWBOY made his MMA debut way back in 2006, beating Nate Mohr at Ring of Fire 21.

Growing up, Cerrone was diagnosed with Attention Deficit Disorder and found his pent up energy would often get him into fights.

He attended Air Academy High School in Colorado, where he began bull riding before taking up kick-boxing in his late teens.

From there, Cerrone wanted to pursue a career in mixed-martial arts and moved to train at Greg Jackson's Submission Fighting Gaidojutsu school in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

Cowboy has gone on to become one of the most prolific MMA fighters ever, but is yet to hold a prestigious UFC title.

Cerrone faces off against Conor McGregor at UFC 246Credit: Getty – Contributor

He has been in FIFTY bouts, with his UFC bow in 2011 when he beat Paul Kelly in a second round stoppage.

His last fight came against Justin Gaethje in September 2019, but Cerrone fell to a first round defeat after a heavy punch from the highly-rated lightweight.

Next up is Conor McGregor, with the pair set to face off in Las Vegas for the Irishman's comeback fight.

When Cerrone was a youngster he was part of the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association.

Despite taking up MMA, he continues to pay homage to his bull riding past by donning a cowboy hat and taking the 'Cowboy' nickname – as well as owning a state-of-the-art ranch.

Cerrone calls his 40-acre training complex the BMF ranch – it's page says: “We don't Breed livestock we Train Bad Mother F*****s”.

The UFC star explains: “I moved here from Colorado, and started looking for a property where I could ride bikes, horses, shoot guns.

“I called my grandpa and said, 'I found a house and some acres I think I want to buy.' He said, 'I'll be right there.'

“He drove down, and he walks right up to the lady and says, 'My grandson wants it. We'll take it.'

“He handed her cash. Didn't even go inside. I was , ‘S*** OK.' None of this was here. We've built everything.”

How many UFC fights has he won?

THERE's no denying that Donald Cerrone s to stay active on the circuit.

He's the busiest UFC fighter in the business and since 2011 has fought four or more times in six years – 2011, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016 and 2019.

Cerrone has the most wins in UFC history – 23 from his 33 bouts.

And his overall MMA record is an impressive 36 wins from 50 fights.

Of those victories, 10 have come by way of knockout whilst 17 have arrived by submission.

One thing that has alluded Cowboy is a coveted UFC world title.

He has fought for the lightweight crown once in 2015, going down in the first round to Rafael dos Anjos.

Mike Tyson, 53, reveals he is in training ahead of shock boxing return for charityMan Utd legend Roy Keane silences Sky Sports host when asked about beardFitness model posts naked selfies and wears tiny bikinis to cheer up fansSerge Aurier facing axe at Tottenham with Jose Mourinho eyeing up new right-backInside Mike Tyson's £890k abandoned mansion before it became a CHURCHInside Bouchard's £3m penthouse Miami apartment with an amazing beach view

When he is fighting Conor McGregor and how can I watch it?

  • Fight night is set for Saturday, January 18.
  • UFC 246 will be broadcast on BT Sport Box Office in the UK.
  • The card will cost £19.95 to purchase.
  • BT Sport Box Office is on Sky channel 490, BT channel 494, and in the live events section on Virgin Media.
  • It will be live streamed on BT Sport’s website and their app after purchase.
  • In the US, the card will be shown on PPV on ESPN+.
  • Expect the main event around 6am on Sunday morning UK time.

Source: https://www.thesun.co.uk/sport/mma/10738785/donald-cerrone-cowboy-ufc-wins/

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UFC workout video - Paul Kelly
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Mobilizations for your “off” days to maintain your range-of-motion and reduce your risk of injury.

Guided pre- and post-exercise mobilizations tailored for your training and sports schedule.

A personal “pain prescription” to fix your aches and stiffness.

Mobilizations for your “off” days to maintain your range of motion and reduce your risk of injury.

The Ready State began as MobilityWOD in 2008. And for over a decade, we pioneered new methods to help athletes with their movement, mobility, and recovery. We worked with Olympic gold medalists, UFC champions, and dozens of other pro sports organizations. But at its core, our message was always focused on helping you be more ready…

…Ready for your next race. Ready for your next workout. Ready to run around with your kids. Ready for anything life throws your way. So we branched out and started to cover other key topics — sleep, down-regulation, nutrition, and more. Our goal is to help you #LiveReady in every part of your life.

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On The Ready State podcast, world-class experts reveal how to get — and stay — ready…for anything. They discuss critical and cutting-edge aspects of peak performance. Everything from fitness, sleep, and diet, to genetics and generational issues.

Listen Now

Explore articles from Kelly and The Ready State team on The Ready State blog. We share comprehensive resources to help you Live Ready. You’ll find detailed instructions for taking control of every aspect of your health — physical, mental, emotional, and social.

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Join a community of peers looking to reach their full potential in The Ready State forum. Or find local experts trained in The Ready State methods with our Directory. We personally review and approve all providers in the Directory to ensure they meet our high standards.

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Enhance your skills as a coach or practitioner with our pro courses. These courses let you learn directly from Dr. Kelly Starrett and other Ready State coaches. You’ll discover our groundbreaking methods for improving human movement and mechanics.

We’ve stress-tested what we teach with the world’s most elite athletes. That includes Olympic gold medalists, UFC champions, and players in the NFL, NBA, MLB, and NHL. And over the past 15 years, we’ve taught our methods to over 20,000 coaches and practitioners at all levels. They’ve used our courses to boost their credentials and advance their careers.

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“I have been following TRS Virtual Mobility Coach religiously these past few years. I have literally seen my performance improve and my pain and injuries go away. This is the best money I have ever spent.”

“One video has instantly transformed my squat!”

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