2. Unilateral triceps cable chop

Tricep Kickbacks: How-to, Benefits, and More

2. Unilateral triceps cable chop

  • How-to
  • Muscles worked
  • Cautions and modifications
  • Talk with a pro
  • Takeaway

The triceps are the large muscles on the back of the upper arms that are responsible for elbow, shoulder, and forearm movements.

Working out your triceps helps to build upper body strength and is an essential part of any strength training routine. Strong triceps stabilize your shoulder joint and are important for daily activities and sports such as tennis, volleyball, and basketball.

Do a 5 to 10 minute warmup before doing these exercises to loosen up your muscles and get your heart pumping. This can involve stretching, walking, or jumping jacks.

Make sure you’re using proper form in order to effectively and safely work the muscles. Increase the intensity of these exercises by engaging the triceps in the top position for one to two seconds longer.

Triceps kickbacks are most often done with dumbbells.

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With dumbbells

This exercise helps you learn how to target the triceps. Choose a weight that’s slightly challenging yet allows you to complete all of the sets using proper form and without straining.

Start with dumbbells that are 5 to 10 pounds each and gradually increase the weight as you gain strength. Substitute soup cans or water bottles if you don’t have weights.

This exercise can also be done one arm at a time in a split stance while standing or kneeling.

To do this:

  1. Hold a dumbbell in each hand with your palms facing in toward each other, keeping your knees bent slightly.
  2. Engage your core and maintain a straight spine as you hinge forward at the waist, bringing your torso almost parallel to the floor.
  3. Keep your upper arms in close to your body and your head in line with your spine, tucking your chin in slightly.
  4. On an exhale, engage your triceps by straightening your elbows.
  5. Hold your upper arms still, only moving your forearms during this movement.
  6. Pause here, then inhale to return the weights to the starting position.
  7. Do 2 to 3 sets of 10 to 15 reps.

With cables

Using a low pulley cable machine helps to keep the movement steady and controlled. Use a single grip handle for this exercise. Don’t move your elbow at all.

To do this:

  1. Stand facing a low pulley cable machine.
  2. Bend forward slightly at the waist so your torso is almost parallel to the floor.
  3. Engage your core and keep your head, neck, and spine in one line.
  4. Place one hand on your thigh for support.
  5. On an exhale, engage your triceps as you slowly extend your arm back as far as you can, keeping your arm in tight by your side.
  6. Pause here, then inhale as your return your arm to the starting position.
  7. Do 2 to 3 sets of 10 to 15 reps.

The triceps are essential for building upper body strength and helping with movement in your shoulders and elbows.

Increasing triceps strength brings stability to your shoulders and arms, improves flexibility, and increases range of motion.

This prevents injury and makes it easier for you to use your upper body in daily activities, such as pushing heavy loads or upper body sports swimming, rowing, and boxing. Strong triceps are also useful in weightlifting exercises, such as bench press or overhead press.

Developing upper body strength is especially important as you age, but it’s a good idea to keep your body strong from a young age. Building muscle strength helps to support bone health and strength, which is useful in treating and preventing osteoporosis.

It can also help to manage arthritis pain by reducing swelling, pain, and bone loss, while strengthening and lubricating joints.

While strength-building exercises provide you with numerous benefits, it’s a good idea to follow a few guidelines to maintain safety and prevent injury.

  • Always warm up and cold down your body for 5 to 10 minutes at the beginning and end of each session.
  • If you’re fairly new to physical activity, make sure you build up slowly and under the guidance of an exercise professional.
  • Use the lowest weight available while you work on learning proper form and technique.
  • Use smooth, steady, controlled movements instead of those that are jerky and forceful.
  • Make sure you’re able to maintain a smooth, natural breath throughout your routine.
  • Be cautious with these exercises if you have any neck, shoulder, or back injuries.
  • If you develop any pain during or after these exercises, stop immediately.
  • Always wait for your body to fully recover from any injury, even if it’s minor, before doing anything more than moderate, gentle exercise.
  • It’s a good idea to take off at least one full day per week to allow your muscles time to rest and recover.

Talk to your doctor if you take medications that could affect your exercise, have existing health concerns, or aren’t usually physically active. If you develop any pain, numbness, or tingling after doing these exercises, discontinue the practice and see your doctor.

Working with a fitness expert is ideal if you want help setting up an exercise program. They can create a routine especially for your needs and goals.

Using good form is key, and they can help make sure you’re doing the exercises properly, using the appropriate weight, and getting the most benefits from your workout.

Triceps kickbacks are a simple and effective way to build arm and upper body strength. Adding them to your routine can help you in other physical activities. Maintain a well-rounded workout routine that includes flexibility, stretching, and balance training, as well as strength exercises and cardio.

Gradually increase your strength over time without surpassing your limit to prevent injury. Most importantly, have fun with your routine and make it an enjoyable part of your life.

Source: https://www.healthline.com/health/tricep-kickbacks

Why Tennis Players Should Lift Weights (Plus Two Free Workouts)

2. Unilateral triceps cable chop

Long ago strength training for tennis wasn’t in vogue, even among the professional players.

Even the great John McEnroe (winner of the US Open in 1979, 80, 81, and 84), famously avoided strength training. To keep himself fit, he would just play as many matches as possible.

He got away with this because of his otherworldly talent but now times have changed, and tennis players look more Serena Williams and Rafael Nadal. If you want an edge, you hit the gym.

If you play tennis or are considering playing, strength training is essential because the attributes needed to play the modern game are developed and enhanced in the weight room.

Ajan Alen/Shutterstock

The Benefits of Strength Training for Tennis Players

Here is what strength training can do for tennis players of all levels and shapes and sizes.

1. Improve Strength

With hard hitting such a huge part of the modern game, having a base of strength is essential. The muscles of the hips, hamstrings, core and the upper body are all involved in ground strokes and serves.

And performing movements in the weight room that use the same motions of the stroke/serve will help improve power and coordination on the court. For example, an overhead med ball slam mimics the motion of the serve and the overhead smash.

[Perfect your form with our guide to the overhead medicine ball slam!]

There are no secrets in the exercises that get you strong. Squats, trap bar deadlifts, carries, and rows are fundamentals.

These exercises aid in providing reactive strength, which is the ability to change quickly from an eccentric to a concentric contraction and their ability to develop maximal forces in minimal time.

ESBuka/Shutterstock

With tennis being a dynamic sport will quick changes of direction, players need the strength to do this quickly while remaining injury free.

Furthermore, due to the unilateral nature of tennis, it is important to address muscle imbalances, because only one side of the body is used and opposing sides/muscle groups get under developed.

That’s why unilateral exercises such as single arm rows and split squats/lunges need to play prominent role in a player’s program.

Furthermore, according to Kevin Mullins, a personal trainer at Equinox in Washington D.C, strength training is critical for tennis players because it helps build resiliency in the soft tissues, especially in the tendons and ligaments.

“Tennis is a violent sport full of positive and negative accelerations on hard surfaces in unpredictable patterns,” he says. “Those athletes need the ability to break down those forces in safe manners.”

[See our complete guide to the split squat here!]

2. Improve Power

Power and strength both need to be trained for a tennis player to be complete.

The difference between power and strength is that strength refers to the ability to overcome resistance, while power is the ability to overcome resistance in the shortest period of time. Consider the difference between a squat and a box jump, or a deadlift and a clean: power-based movements are more explosive.

And nothing in the modern game is more important than a powerful serve.

A powerful serve shortens points and demoralizes opponents. It puts the pressure on the other player to do the same and frees the big server to swing away on service returns.

Although advances in the modern racquet have made it easier to hit the ball harder, you still need pop in the upper body and core. This is where strengthening the muscles of the core comes in.

Exercises such as med ball burpees, sit up with med ball pass, side planks, and side planks with a unilateral row all use movement patterns that closely simulate the tennis serve.(1)

The burpee, or the squat thrust if you’re standing up rather than jumping up, trains the transfer of power from the lower to the upper body. the sit up with med ball pass overloads the abdominals concentrically while the side plank variations stabilize the lower and upper body (shoulders and glutes) muscles.

These exercises provide the foundation for a powerful serve.

nd3000/Shutterstock

3. Injury Prevention

The physical demands of the game, the unilateral nature of the sport, and repetitive movements such as the serve, forehand and backhand, can all increase injury risk if the body isn’t strengthened the right way. Targeted strength training exercises will help with injury prevention. (2)

Injuries in the shoulder and elbows are common and need to be addressed in the gym, says Mullins.

Training the muscles of the rotator cuffs and mid-back are critical, but a lot of people overlook the forearms and stress in the biceps and triceps. Quality arm work focused on a full range of motion with adequate volume is critical to long term health and performance.

Exercises such as side lying external rotation, prone horizontal abduction, 90/90 external rotations will help keep the shoulders healthy. And exercises for the elbows (and forearms) include wrist flexion and extension using a dumbbell or a wrist roller.(3)

Furthermore, due to the lateral nature of the game with quick changes of direction, ankle sprains are common.

Training ankle mobility in the warm up with exercises such as ankle mobilizations and strengthening the ankles with lateral walks and the exercise below will help prevent ankle sprains too. (We’ll put all this together in the workouts in the next section.)

4. Enhance Speed/Change of direction

Tennis is a 3D sport with random, explosive events. Thus, training must occur in a 3D way to have the most transfer.

This means extending traditional patterns such as lunges and squats into the frontal/transverse planes and performing drop steps, shuffles, and power are critical says Mullins.

Exercises such as Cossack squats, side lunges, drop lunges, side shuffles, and box jump variations come into play after a strength base is established.

Plyometrics (eccentric loading followed by a concentric contraction) improve explosive movements by improving the power output of the player. Furthermore, being able to absorb force and quickly transfer it results in better and faster movement and changes of direction.

Research agrees: junior tennis players who completed 9 weeks of plyometric training improved fitness characteristics that rely on reactive strength and explosiveness such as, lateral reaction time, 4-meter lateral and forward sprints, and drop jumps.(4)

Sample Strength Workout for Tennis Players

Here’s a sample routine from Kevin Mullins combining the factors just discussed.

Warm up

  1. Ankle Dorsiflexion/Plantar flexion/Inversion/Eversion mobility
  2. Self myofascial release: think of using a lacrosse ball and foam roller on your soles, glutes, back, and outer thighs.
  3. Hip Rockers
  4. Hip 90’90s

A: Mobility, Speed, Power, Upper Pull

Group one and group two are density circuits. Choose a time frame, say 20 to 30 minutes, and do as many circuits as possible.

The sets and reps you’ll do is dependent on your goal. For example, for strength keep the reps between 4 to 8. If hypertrophy or endurance is the goal, keep reps between 12 to 15 for each exercise.

Do these exercises in a circuit fashion keep the rest between exercises minimal and resting for 1 minute ( or longer) at the end of each circuit.

Group 1

  1. Trap Bar Deadlifts
  2. Dumbbell Snatches
  3. Prone Dumbbell Rows
  4. Cable Chops
  5. Alternating Crab Reaches

Group 2

  1. Supinated Pulldowns
  2. Hollow Holds
  3. 3D Dumbbell Lunge and Clean Complex
  4. Side plank DB Holds
  5. Band Pull aparts

Conditioning

Tennis Court Call Outs (Imaginary ball-gets).

B: Speed, Shoulders, Core, Glutes

Perform the same warm up described above.

Speed Development

30-yard sprints x 8

Group 1

  1. Barbell Hip Thrusts
  2. Cossack Squats
  3. Cable Face Pulls
  4. Band Pull aparts
  5. Seated Cable Row

Group 2

  1. Goblet Squats with heels elevated
  2. Glute Bridge Marches
  3. V-ups or Hollow Holds
  4. Medicine Ball Chops
  5. Broad Jumps

Conditioning

20-yard shuttle runs x 5

Plank Position Shoulder taps x 20s (5 rounds)

Wrapping up

Although conditioning plays a huge role in tennis, targeted strength training before, during and after the season makes the player more resilient, less prone to injury and able to smoke the ball past his or her opponent.

Featured image via ESBuka/Shutterstock

References

Source: https://barbend.com/strength-training-for-tennis/

10 Landmine Exercises You’ve Never Tried – and Should

2. Unilateral triceps cable chop

Believe it or not, the landmine was invented long before they came out with this:

The Rogue Landmine

Those with a considerable amount of training experience will remember what it was shoving a barbell in the corner of the room to do T-bar rows. You knew you were at a good gym when the drywall had a designated hole for the bar.

Fortunately, the landmine takes care of this problem. Unfortunately, gym-goers assume that’s all it does. You might see the odd standing one-arm press or Russian twist (180s), but nothing close to what this device is capable of.

“The landmine is an inexpensive, convenient piece of equipment that offers challenging variations for high-value training movements (push, pull, knee bend, hip extend).”

Instead of continuing to watch this fantastic piece of equipment collect dust at facilities across the country (while there’s a lineup at the Smith machine), I decided to compile a list of its many uncommon, but extremely effective uses.

The main advantages of working with the landmine are the fatter grip, the ease of adding heavier weights (compared to dumbbells), and the ability to hit abnormal angles in standing and kneeling positions. I hate to use the word functional, but after reviewing some of the movements I’ve outlined below, I think you’ll agree it’s appropriate.

1. Two-Handed Landmine Shoulder Press

This can be performed standing or kneeling, and from mid-chest or either shoulder. The kneeling option is the superior choice for shoulder work and early training phases.

It’s also quite useful during power or explosive workouts when you add the hip extension (performed at the end of the video).

The standing varieties seem better suited as an add-on to some of the leg options listed below.

2. Landmine Front Squat (Lumberjack Squat) + Press

I’m a huge fan of this exercise because it forces you into an ideal squat position. Even newcomers have trouble messing up the form on this one, as the landmine naturally pushes you onto your heels with an upright upper-body position.

Try playing around with the shoulder transfer I perform in the video. It transforms this movement into a challenging core exercise.

3. One-Arm Bent-Over Landmine Row (Meadow’s Row)

Since I discovered the Pendlay row (bent over barbell rows with a pause on the floor), it’s been a go-to exercise for myself and my clients. The pause on the floor gives you the brief recovery necessary to maximize pulling power, while challenging more than just the upper back.

Until recently, I didn’t think there was a one-arm equivalent. But that was before I discovered the Meadow’s row:

I suppose this can be accomplished with a dumbbell, but it’s nowhere near as comfortable as the landmine. Not to mention the fat grip, better range of motion, and potential for massive loads (yeah, I know what I just said).

As I do in the video, you can play around with your angle to the bar. I prefer being perpendicular, as I feel I get better range at the top.

You may also notice I keep my stance square to mimic the Pendlay row, as opposed to split stance used by John Meadows. Personal preference, but I’m assuming staggered gets more power – or maybe John Meadows just gets more power?

4. Half-Kneeling One-Arm Landmine Press

I give Tony Gentilcore credit for introducing me to the half-kneeling one-arm landmine press.

I’ve found this exercise to be exceptionally useful in teaching clients to press with a properly positioned elbow and a stabilized core.

Hand an internally rotated client a light dumbbell to press over his head, and it looks excruciatingly painful, but set him up with a landmine, and he’s an instant success.

5. Landmine Lunge + Optional Press

I have to admit I thought I invented this exercise. But that was before my Internet search popped up that Tony Gentilcore character again (does this guy ever get out?). That being said, I will take credit for the alternating lunge and the shoulder transfer.

Other than converting this into a full-body exercise, the different press options can help you forget about the legs during higher rep protocols. For instance, 8 reps with alternating shoulder presses and 8 straight-ahead presses is 24 reps or 12 reps per leg – a challenging feat for most.

Similar to the lumberjack squat, this exercise forces proper form. It pushes your torso upright and doesn’t let you get away with improper positioning of the legs.

6. One-Arm Landmine Clean and Press

These are a great addition to a HIIT or metabolic conditioning workout. I suggest keeping the weight light and performing multiple reps for speed, as this movement can put the shoulder in an awkward position. The second clean and press variation is preferred, as the press is more natural and you have the option of alternating between arms.

Worth mentioning in this category is Dr. Jim Stoppani ’s alternating landmine deadlift:

7. Landmine Sumo Squat

After watching the next video, I’m guessing you’ll be as confused as me as to why this exercise isn’t more popular.

In my opinion, it’s the perfect exercise for a beginner and an interesting alternative for an experienced lifter.

Compared to using a dumbbell, there’s no restriction on weight, and to say it’s easier to perform than a barbell sumo squat would be an understatement.

When first attempted, you’ll notice a ton of glute activation and little tension on the low back (if any). Interestingly, it allows for a bit of a forward lean, which I’d argue makes it more conducive to athletic performance.

8. Supine One-Arm Landmine Press

Ben Bruno deserves all the credit on this one, as he’s been experimenting with landmine floor presses for some time now.

As you’ll see from my video, I prefer being perpendicular to the bar. Plus, I take it one step further and put myself on a Swiss ball.

(For the record: I’m well aware that we go to the gym to get strong, and not prep for Cirque Du So Lame. The Swiss ball is simply an interesting alternative that offers a superior range of motion to the floor. If you’re anti-unstable surface, a bench could accomplish the same goal.)

Aside from the fat grip, and the potential for heavier weight, the advantage of using a landmine instead of a dumbbell, is the ability to hit an uncommon, but favorable pressing angle. This makes it useful for bodybuilders attacking specific muscles and athletes requiring strength in non-standard positions ( in football or MMA).

Speaking of MMA fighters, take a look at this unusual floor pressing variation from Martin Rooney :

As Rooney says, “When everyone shares, everyone wins.” The one-arm Danish floor press is definitely worth sharing.

9. One-Leg Landmine RDL

This move is once again courtesy of Ben Bruno, a.k.a. the Lord of the Landmine. Ben has been popularizing different maneuvers with this apparatus for years, and this is one of the best.

With a dumbbell, the single-leg Romanian deadlift can be quite challenging. Not only because of balance, but because most people are too concerned with touching the ground instead of getting height with their back leg. Fortunately, the landmine addresses both of these challenges.

The variation in the video above is quite effective (especially if balance is a challenge), but I prefer being perpendicular to the bar as Ben is here:

10. Half-Kneeling Landmine Trunk Twist

Standing landmine trunk twists are challenging if you’ve had a short lifting career. It feels natural to bend the arms, bring the bar close to the body, and power it with everything other than the core. These problems are exactly why the half-kneeling option is such an attractive alternative.

Benefits of this movement:

  • No cheating with the legs
  • Easier to maintain straight arms
  • Forced to keep bar away from your body
  • Isolates one side at a time

Landmine = Goldmine

The landmine is an inexpensive, convenient piece of equipment that offers challenging variations for high-value training movements (push, pull, knee bend, hip extend). Although I think you should try all of the exercises discussed (along with those T-bar rows, standing one-arm presses, and Russian twists), I recommend starting with these three:

  1. Tony Gentilcore’s one-arm half-kneeling landmine press
  2. John Meadow’s one-arm bent-over landmine row
  3. Mike Sheridan’s landmine sumo squat

Kidding! I’m only putting my name on the rollout, clean and press, and half-kneeling trunk twist.

Check out these related articles:

Source: https://breakingmuscle.com/fitness/10-landmine-exercises-you-ve-never-tried-and-should

OVERHAND vs UNDERHAND Tricep Extensions | What’s better?

2. Unilateral triceps cable chop

**If you prefer reading instead of watching, here’s a transcript of the video above.**

Have you ever wondered whether you should do Tricep Extensions with a Pronated i.e palms over grip with a bar or with a Hammer grip using ropes? Ever wondered which of these is better?

Or better yet, have you seen someone do extensions with a Supinated i.e palms under grip and wondered if that works your Triceps any differently?

If you’ve answered yes to either of those questions then you definitely want to pay attention to what I have to say because I’m going to go SCIENCE up in this bitch!

In today’s article, we’re going to discuss whether different hand positions in Tricep Extensions affect the Triceps differently. And which is the best grip to use in this exercise.

You’ve probably seen different versions of Cable Tricep Extensions – with a straight bar, an EZ bar, with a rope or even with handles with an underhand grip.

You may have even heard a ‘bro’ in your gym saying:

“BRO! Do the overhand grip to target your lateral head. Do the underhand grip to target your long head” or “BRO. Do them all for variation man.Variation! VARIATION!”

Man that word peeves me off, SO much!

Anyway, let’s look into these ideas and if they have any merit.

Diving straight into that, lets first look at some anatomy here…

Supination and Pronation. This occurs due to movement in the bones of your forearms – the Radius and the Ulna around the Radio-Ulnar Joint – both the proximal (near elbow) and distal (near wrist).

When you Pronate, your Radius crosses over the Ulna . And when you Supinate, your radius bone is parallel to the Ulna. So both these movements occur via movement of the RADIUS bone around the Radio-Ulnar joints.

Now, the Triceps muscle attaches to the Ulna. It has no attachment to the Radius.

So I invite you to think about this…

How would the turning of this radius bone which is what happens in changing your grip between pronation and supination have any effect on the Triceps’ ability to extend the elbow?

IT DOES NOT.

The Tricep muscle is not influenced by any change in your wrist position.

What DOES happen when you change your grip is that your grip strength in that position becomes the limiting factor in the movement.

And the three, the strongest grip would be the pronated grip, followed by hammer and then the weakest would be your supinated position.

So when you decide to do Tricep extensions with a Supinated grip, all you end up doing is opting for the weakest grip which cuts down the amount of weight you can use and therefore provides LESS stimulus to the Triceps than you could have with a Pronated grip.

You just find it more difficult to extend that weight with this grip because your forearms and grip are giving way. Not your triceps.

And now to answer the question, what’s the best grip to use in Tricep extensions. Now while a Pronated grip is indeed the best grip the three mentioned above; there is another grip that works even better than pure pronation and that is what’s called as the NEUTRAL GRIP.

This Neutral Grip is somewhat in between Pronation and Hammer position. Its basically just a slight upward tilt from pronation. And the reason why it’s the best grip to use is because it’s the MOST COMFORTABLE grip all especially in terms of stress on the wrist joint.

More comfort and stability on the wrist joint = Greater ability to lift heavier loads/perform better in the exercise.

And this is why, when opting to do Tricep Extensions, one should resort to the Neutral Grip – either by opting for an EZ bar if doing the movement bilaterally (both arms working together on a single object) or a single handle for unilateral movement  (one arm working at a time) and letting the wrist default to its most natural, comfortable position.

So there you go! That’s your comparison between the Overhand vs Underhand Grip on Tricep Extensions as well as the best grip to be used.

Hope you’ve found this piece informative and if so, please SHARE it so it can reach out to as many people as possible and together we can bust broscience and help spread the information.

Keep Learning, Keep Growing!
Suneet

PS: What grip were you using for Tricep Extensions until now? Comment below and let me know J

Source: https://www.sebastianfitnesssolutions.com/blog/overhand-vs-underhand-tricep-extensions-whats-better/

Functional Trainer | Keiser.com

2. Unilateral triceps cable chop

The Functional Trainer represents the core machine within the Infinity Series. As the name implies, it is a multi-functional machine for a complete body workout.

It can be used for hundreds of different exercises, ranging from rehabilitation to sports-specific applications and is one of the most basic and versatile cable machines available. The ability to train at any speed and without any impact makes it the product of choice for many different applications.

With its space-saving design, the unit is available with or without a base. (Units without base must be bolted directly and securely to the floor.)   

The Functional Trainer features two adjustable arms, which can be adjusted for virtually any training position. Each pulley swings independently of the machine to match the line of pull. In addition to its already space-saving design, the unit can either stand alone or be floor mounted.

Height Arms Up (with Base) 93″ / 2362 mm Height Arms Down (with Base) 62″ / 1574.8 mm Width Arms Out (with Base) 94″ / 2387.6 mm Base Width 84″ / 2133.6 mm Depth 48″ / 1219.2 mm Weight (with Base) 300 lbs / 136 kg Weight (Floor Mounted) 130 lbs / 59 kg Resistance Range Bilaterally 0 – 106 lbs / 0 – 48 kg Resistance Range Unilaterally 0 – 53 lbs / 0 – 24 kg Cable Length Bilaterally 72″ / 1829 mm Cable Length Unilaterally 144″ / 3658 mm

  • Complete control of resistance levels
  • Smooth pneumatic resistance to reduce shock loading to connective tissues and joints
  • Takes up less space and time with a small footprint and multi-user pieces that allow group training
  • Unlimited possibilities for training – any load, any speed, any plane
  • Versatility that allows you to customize your workout
  • ADA Compliant – Section 44 Disable Access Tax Credit

The Keiser Cable Handle has an impact resistant ABS body with soft and grippy rubber. It is overmolded as one unit and uses military specied strapping.

The Keiser Cable Handle has an impact resistant ABS body with soft and grippy rubber. It is overmolded as one unit and uses military specied strapping.

The 3’ Keiser Chop Bar is constructed of a knurled lightweight Aluminum tubing. Heavy duty bearings and military specied strapping combine to allow maximum freedom to move this bar without creating wear at the attachment point on either end. Testing has proven this mechanism will outlast all. 

The 3’ Keiser Chop Bar is constructed of a knurled lightweight Aluminum tubing. Heavy duty bearings and military specied strapping combine to allow maximum freedom to move this bar without creating wear at the attachment point on either end. Testing has proven this mechanism will outlast all. 

The Keiser Back/Lat Strap has a impact resistant ABS body with soft and grippy rubber. It is overmolded as one unit and uses military specied strapping. 2’ long from handles to d-ring 4’ from handle to handle.

The Keiser Back/Lat Strap has a impact resistant ABS body with soft and grippy rubber. It is overmolded as one unit and uses military specied strapping. 2’ long from handles to d-ring 4’ from handle to handle.

The Functional Trainer Base Extension is a floor mounted attachment that elevates all of the arm positions to a higher vertical position by 12 inches. This was designed to be used by taller people to get full range of motion on their exercises.

The Functional Trainer Base Extension is a floor mounted attachment that elevates all of the arm positions to a higher vertical position by 12 inches. This was designed to be used by taller people to get full range of motion on their exercises.

The Functional Trainer Floor Mount is available to mount the unit directly to the facility floor. THE FLOOR MOUNTED BASE WILL NEED TO BE BOLTED DIRECTLY TO THE FLOOR.

The Functional Trainer Floor Mount is available to mount the unit directly to the facility floor. THE FLOOR MOUNTED BASE WILL NEED TO BE BOLTED DIRECTLY TO THE FLOOR.

The Functional Trainer free standing mount is available for stand-alone use and aligned with the equipment's space saving design. THE FREESTANDING BASE DOES NOT NEED TO BE BOLTED TO THE FLOOR.

The Functional Trainer free standing mount is available for stand-alone use and aligned with the equipment's space saving design. THE FREESTANDING BASE DOES NOT NEED TO BE BOLTED TO THE FLOOR.

Designed to easily attach to Infinity machines for abductor and adductor work, the Pro Ankle Cinch Strap is made of 4 1/2” wide nylon and thick neoprene padding. Equipped with a steel D-ring, it fits around ankles of all sizes.

Designed to easily attach to Infinity machines for abductor and adductor work, the Pro Ankle Cinch Strap is made of 4 1/2” wide nylon and thick neoprene padding. Equipped with a steel D-ring, it fits around ankles of all sizes.

Made of 4 1/2” wide nylon and thick neoprene padding, the Pro Thigh Cinch Strap attaches to an Infinity Series machine for glute, hamstring, quad and hip flexor work.

Made of 4 1/2” wide nylon and thick neoprene padding, the Pro Thigh Cinch Strap attaches to an Infinity Series machine for glute, hamstring, quad and hip flexor work.

The Keiser Triceps Rope has low-friction POM end caps and a Keiser branded curved connector designed to increase the life of the polypropylene rope and make it more aesthetically pleasing. 3’ long x 1” diameter PolyPropylene rope. 

The Keiser Triceps Rope has low-friction POM end caps and a Keiser branded curved connector designed to increase the life of the polypropylene rope and make it more aesthetically pleasing. 3’ long x 1” diameter PolyPropylene rope. 

With a 4 1/2” nylon cinch strap and neoprene padding, the waist belt is equipped with dual steel D-rings to accommodate up to a 44” waist.

With a 4 1/2” nylon cinch strap and neoprene padding, the waist belt is equipped with dual steel D-rings to accommodate up to a 44” waist.

Source: https://www.keiser.com/fitness-equipment/functional-training/infinity-series-functional-trainer

7 Exercises to Create an Anti-Rotation Progression Sequence

2. Unilateral triceps cable chop

Core strength is important for every movement and activity in life. Without core strength, our bodies become uncoordinated, weak or susceptible to injury. One of the core’s main functions is to brace the spine for stability, which is particularly essential to support the body during unwanted motions. 

Anti-rotation exercises train core stability without rotating the torso. This is important for the lumbar spine, which is a stabilized joint (with very little range of motion). Thoracic rotation is necessary for various movements and athletic motions. However, core stability and anti-rotation movement are important for many pursuits. 

Consider this example from everyday life: If two people pass each other on the street and knock shoulders, the core needs to react, stabilize, resist rotation and stay upright. If the core does not activate, the person will follow the rotation pattern and fall. 

A rugby scrum offers a good example from sports: As opponents connect, the core must activate to maintain level ground.

If these muscles are weak, the opponent will have the advantage to push and rotate the opposing team member to gain access to the ball.

If you’ve ever seen a scrum where two teams maintain stability but rotate the scrum in a uniform and (counter) clockwise fashion around the ball, it means both teams are strong in stabilizing their position. 

Here are seven anti-rotation exercises to show how to build from the basics with bodyweight movements and progress toward loaded cable exercises. These exercises are appropriate for every type of client who requires core development and strength. It is up to you, the trainer, to determine sets and repetitions the client’s fitness level. 

Seated Bench Partnered Anti-rotation

Have the client begin on a bench with an upright spine and feet flat on the floor. Stand behind the client and place your left hand in front of the body above the pectoral muscles.

Place your right hand behind the shoulder around the trapezius muscle and scapula. Apply pressure on both hands to make the client contract the core without rotating in either direction. Apply pressure for five to 10 seconds.

Switch hand positions to the other side. Continue several repetitions on each side.

Progression: Have the client close his or her eyes and randomly choose sides to increase unpredictability. 

Seated Unstable Surface Anti-rotation

Have the client sit on an unstable surface (stability ball works best) with an upright spine and feet flat on the floor. Stand in front of the client and cue the client to bring the elbows to 90-degrees with palms pressed together.

Apply pressure on the right side of the client’s hand and hold for several seconds. The client must resist the pressure in order to anti-rotate. Switch to the other side. Apply pressure, alternating on the right and left side of the hands.

Progression:  Increase lever length by extending the arms; and/or close the eyes. 

Standing Anti-rotation

Position the client upright in a bilateral stance (feet hip- to shoulder-distance apart) and arms extended in front of the body with the palms pressed together. Apply pressure on the right and left side of the client’s hands. You can also apply pressure on the forearms to stimulate change.  Apply pressure, alternating on the right and left side of the hands.

Progression: Position the client in a unilateral stance. 

Anti-rotation Band Squats

Position the client into a squat stance with arms out in front. Have the client hold one end of a resistance band. Stand on the client’s right side, holding tension on the band.

Cue the client to perform a squat while resisting the band (this requires the left side to activate more). The goal is to squat while maintaining stability.

After several repetitions, move to the left side of the client’s body. 

Anti-rotation Band with Split Stance

Position the client into a lunge stance with the right leg forward and arms out in front. Have the client hold one end of a resistance band. Stand on the client’s left side, holding tension on the band. Cue the client to perform a lunge while resisting the band. Complete several repetitions before switching sides.

Alternative Exercise: Have the client perform a one-legged squat or balance exercise instead. 

Kneeling Cable Pallof Press

Place a mat on the floor. Load the cable machine and have the client kneel on the pad. Place the cable in the client’s hands, with tension. Have the client hold his or her hands close to the chest. Maintaining stability, cue the client to extend the arms and then draw the arms back toward the chest. Continue several repetitions.

Progression: Perform in a standing position. 

Standing Anti-rotation Cable Chop

Use the triceps extension rope and adjust the cable higher than the shoulders. Load the cable and position the client to where the right side of the body faces the cable machine with a bilateral foot stance.

Have the client grab one end of the rope in each hand, contract the core and chop the arms diagonally toward the left hip. The elbows will flex and extend naturally, but minimal movement should occur between the pectorals and hips.

Complete several repetitions before switching sides.

Regression: Perform half-kneeling.

Source: https://www.acefitness.org/education-and-resources/professional/expert-articles/5625/7-exercises-to-create-an-anti-rotation-progression-sequence/

​The Versatility of Cable Machines

2. Unilateral triceps cable chop

Recently I have been writing a series of “How to use X’ blogs, covering how to use everything from cardio machines such as the elliptical and the treadmill, to free weights, to small pieces such as the stability ball and foam roller. I even broke down how to properly warm-up and cool-down. By now you are all glorified exercise mavens — or at least on your way there!

What have we not talked about thus far? Larger pieces of workout equipment such as cable machines or full home gym equipment. Today we fill the void. This blog, cable machines. Next blog, home gyms.

Cables are a personal favourite.

Why? They are versatile — they allow for traditional strength exercises such as triceps press-downs and biceps curls, and also dynamic full-body motions such as wood chops and single-limb motions (which require core stability) such as unilateral flys. I am biased towards the cable cross system I bought for my studio; I love that the arms of the cable machine don’t simply move up and down, but also forwards and backwards. Can you say fitness fun?

Two ways to use cables

Broadly speaking, there are two ways to use cables: either you mimic more traditional strength moves (such as flys) or perform more dynamic multi-joint — often sports-specific — moves (such as the wood chop).

Triceps press-downs: Stand facing the machine holding a press-down bar or rope. Move the cable “arm” to its high position so you are pulling down. Chest out. Core engaged. Keep your elbows into your sides.
To perform the move, straighten your arms. Then slowly control the weight back to your starting position. Don’t let your elbows leave your sides.

Biceps curls: Stand facing the machine holding a press-down bar or rope. Move the cable “arm” to its low position, so you are lifting weight up. Chest out. Core engaged. Elbows into your sides. Arms start straight. To perform the move, bend your elbows. Then slowly control the weight back to your starting position. Don’t let your elbows leave your sides.

Cable flys: Face away from the machine. Hold one D handle in each hand with both arms of the machine at chest height. Start with your arms almost straight — have a slight bend in your elbows. Move from the shoulders so your arms move in front of you — as if you were hugging a tree. Keep the angle of your elbows stable. Slowly control your arms back to their starting position.

More dynamic functional Moves

Wood chop: Start holding a D handle with the cable machine arm at its lowest position. Stand perpendicular to the machine with your right leg closest to the machine. Squat down with your arms straight and hands to the outside of the right leg. As you exhale rotate your body left — arms straight. Use your pelvis and core to initiate the rotation. Control back down.

For variety, try a high wood chop: The motion is the same, but the arm of machine is anchored high. Thus, your arms start high. Squat as you “chop” your arms down towards the floor (arms end to the outside of the outside ankle).

Dynamic chest flys: Make the traditional chest fly dynamic by doing a “high fly” (machine arms start above your shoulders), a “low fly” (machine arms start below hip height), or a “single-arm fly” (arm at any level — stabilize with your core so your pelvis stays stable), or by adding a lunge to the motion.

A few things to keep in mind

-When training with cables you can manipulate variables including reps, sets, weight, rest, arm height, tempo (speed), attachment types (rope, D handle, straight bar, etc), and whether you do bilateral or unilateral variations. How you manipulate these variables will depend on your goals and fitness level.

-If you’re a newbie lifter, aim for 1-2 sets of your chosen exercise. A set is the completion of a pre-determined number of repetitions. A repetition is one time through a motion. So, if you are doing 2 sets of twelve reps, you would complete 12 full repetitions without resting. After resting you would complete a second set of 12 repetitions.

-If your goal is muscular endurance, aim for 12-15 reps. For muscular strength and hypertrophy (growth) aim for 8-12 reps with more weight. For muscular power and strength aim for fewer reps (5-8) with a higher weight.

-Typically, the higher your weight and the lower your repetitions, the longer your rest period.

-In general, faster movements develop power, speed, and fast-twitch muscle fibres. A slower tempo develops control and strength and is an excellent way to get you acquainted with a movement pattern.

Don't confuse people who move quickly because they never learned correct lifting techniques with experienced lifters who are taking their workouts to the next level. Cable newbies should start by using a manageable weight and a slower, more controlled tempo.

Only progress to performing explosive exercises when you can execute the motion with perfect form.

Don’t want to invest in cables, but want a similar workout?

Read my “How to Use X” blog on the resistance band. In the blog I explain how by investing in a resistance band and a door frame attachment (both under $10) you can replicate any exercise traditionally performed on a cable machine, including wood chops, triceps press-downs, etc. The attachment lets you hook the band into any door to create a make-shift cable machine.

Source: https://www.flamanfitness.com/blog/the-versatility-of-cable-machines