How To Build Muscle: Use This Gym Training Plan

This Workout Will Build Size and Muscle in 60 Days

How To Build Muscle: Use This Gym Training Plan

The 60-day plan below is designed specifically for ectomorphs, or “hard gainers”. It focuses on making you bigger and stronger.

As strength coach Greg Nuckols says: “To get stronger, you need to get bigger. And to get bigger, you need to get stronger. Training for one without the other doesn’t really make sense for most people.”

In this routine, you’ll perform big-muscle movements, so squats, bench presses and deadlifts.

You’ll do these exercises a lot because these movements force your muscles to grow, and make it easier to overload your body as you grow stronger.

We know, doing the same exercises day in, day out may seem boring, but for most guys, most of the time, staying consistent with the big lifts makes a big difference.

So if you’re ready throw off the prefix ‘little’, and want to gain considerable size then let’s go. But before we do, there are some general ground rules you need to be aware of with this workout.

The Muscle-Building Workout

1. We'd never advise you to omit cardio altogether, but if putting on size is your goal, expending more calories isn't going to help you. One or two 30-minute sessions per week is more than enough, but make sure you're doing your cardio on non-lifting days.

2. Whatever you're currently eating, you need to eat more.

3. Eat more. We can't stress this enough.

4. Don’t alter the programme in any way. Don’t add anything or take anything out. Just follow it to bulk up.

The 60-Day Muscle-Building Workout Routine for Skinny Men

Perform each pair of exercises as a superset. Do one set of the first exercise, rest for the stated amount of time, and then do one set of the second exercise. Rest if noted, and then repeat. Continue until you’ve completed all of the sets for each exercise in the pair.

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When you see a letter without a number next to it—such as “D”—do the exercise as a straight set. That is, do one set of the exercise, rest for the prescribed time, and then do another set.

Rest at least one day between workouts, and schedule a maximum of three training sessions per week.

Week 1

Follow set and rep prescriptions laid out below.

Day 1

A1.Barbell Back Squat: 3 sets of 5 reps

A2.Chin-up: 2 sets of AMRAP (as many reps as possible). If you can’t perform a chin-up, do a band-assisted version.

Rest 1 minute between exercises. Rest 90 seconds after the superset is complete.

B1.Dumbbell Bench Press: 2 sets of 8 to 12 reps

B2.Dumbbell Single-Arm Row: 3 sets of 10 reps per arm. Hold a 2-second pause at the top of each rep.

Only rest when needed. Rest 90 to 120 seconds after the superset is complete.

C1.Barbell Straight-Leg Deadlift: 3 sets of 12 to 15 reps

C2.Cable Core Press: 3 sets of 10 reps per side

Only rest when needed. Rest 90 to 120 seconds after the superset is complete.

D.Dumbbell Farmer’s Walk: 3 sets of 40-yard carries

Rest 1 minute between each set.

Day 2

A1.Barbell Bench Press: 3 sets of 5 reps
A2.Chin-up: 2 sets of AMRAP (as many reps as possible). If you can’t perform a chinup, do a band-assisted version.

Rest 1 minute between exercises. Rest 90 seconds after the superset is complete.

B1.Trap Bar Deadlift: 3 sets of 8 reps
B2.Dive Bomber Push-up: 3 sets of 8 to 10 reps

Only rest when needed.

Rest 90 to 120 seconds after the superset is complete.

C1.Dumbbell Goblet Squat: 3 sets of 12 to 15 reps

C2.Barbell Bent-Over Overhand-Grip Row: 3 sets of 5 to 6 reps. Hold a 1 to 2 second pause at the top of each rep.

Only rest when needed. Rest 90 to 120 seconds after the superset is complete.

D.Dumbbell Reverse Lunge: 2 sets of 8 to 10 reps per leg

Rest 1 minute between each set.

Day 3

A1.Sumo Deadlift: 3 sets of 5 reps

A2.Single-Arm Landmine Press: 2 sets of 8 reps per arm

Rest 1 minute between exercises. Rest 90 seconds after the superset is complete.

B1.Barbell Front Squat: 3 sets of 8 to 10 reps

B2.Single-Leg Hip Thrust with Shoulders on Bench: 3 sets of 10 reps per leg

Only rest when needed. Rest 90 to 120 seconds after the superset is complete.

C1.Close-Grip Bench Press: 2 sets of 12 to 15 reps

C2.Barbell Bent-Over Underhand-Grip Row: 3 sets of 10 to 12 reps

Only rest when needed. Rest 90 to 120 seconds after the superset is complete.

D.Face Pull: 2 sets of 20 reps

Rest 1 minute between each set.

Week 2-8 plan

Week 2: Add one set to both exercises in superset A1-A2 for days 1 to 3.

Week 3: Add one set to both exercises in superset A1-A2 for days 1 to 3.

Week 4: Add one set to both exercises in superset A1-A2 for days 1 to 3.

Week 5: Follow week 1's rep/set protocol for superset A1-A2 for days 1 to 3, but use a heavier load. Strive to use more weight every week from here on out.

Week 6: Same as week 2.

Week 7: Same as week 3.

Week 8: Same as week 4.

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Source: https://www.menshealth.com/uk/workouts/a759093/the-workout-plan-for-skinny-men/

The 4-Week Workout Plan to Gain 10 Pounds of Muscle

How To Build Muscle: Use This Gym Training Plan

It’s a lofty goal: Gain 10 pounds of muscle in just one month.

While such results are aggressive and can’t continue at the same torrid rate indefinitely, we’ve seen firsthand individuals who’ve followed our mass-gaining programs and reached double digits in four short weeks, averaging gains of 2-3 pounds a week.

Trust us, it can be done. But if there’s one thing such a bold goal needs, it’s an ambitious training and nutrition strategy. In regard to nutrition, don’t even think about taking that aspect lightly.

You can work out all you want, but if you don’t ingest adequate calories and macronutrients, you won’t build muscle. What and when you eat is paramount to your results, and you’ll find all you need to know about gaining mass in a short amount of time in our bulking diet meal plan.

First up, however, is training. Our two-phase program is designed to build muscle via the right balance of mass-building exercises, sufficient volume and intensity-boosting techniques. It’s time to get started on your next 10 pounds.

Weeks 1-2: Heavy Hitter

The first two weeks of the program are all about lifting heavy with mass-building compound exercises.

For everything but abs and calves, reps fall in the 6-8 range; for those accustomed to doing sets of 8-12, this means going heavier than normal.

There are very few isolation exercises during this phase for chest, back, shoulders and legs because the emphasis is on moving as much weight as possible to add strength and size.

The volume here isn’t excessive. You’ll do 11 sets total for large muscle groups (the one exception being shoulders, for which you’ll do 15) and train each bodypart once a week. Reason being, to pack on tons of mass you need ample recovery time.

Doing endless sets in each workout can easily put you in a catabolic (muscle-wasting) state in which lean tissue is broken down, not built up.

Gaining 10 pounds of muscle in such a short period requires the right balance of adequate volume to rest and recovery.

The four-day split pairs a large bodypart (chest, back, shoulders, quads/hams) with one or two smaller muscle groups (tri’s, bi’s, traps, calves, abs) in each workout. This helps ensure that you’re fresh when doing your heaviest compound exercises.

Weeks 3-4: Intensity Boost

The second half of the program is all about maximizing size with slightly higher reps and an emphasis on intensity. Rep ranges move up to 10-12 for most exercises, which is ideal for promoting muscle hypertrophy (growth).

Overall volume increases slightly during these two weeks, mainly due to the addition of isolation exercises that you’ll perform before compound movements for your chest, back, shoulders and legs. Called pre-exhaustion, this technique dramatically increases workout intensity.

You fatigue the main target muscle with an isolation exercise, then hit it in this fatigued state with a compound move, which if done right will lead to your main muscle failing before assistance muscles give out.

(For example, for chest the dumbbell flye hits the pecs directly, so your triceps shouldn’t end up being the weak link and cause the termination of the set during the bench press).

This phase continues to employ a four-day split, but bodyparts are paired differently—namely, chest and back are trained on the same day (Day 1), as are biceps and triceps (Day 4).

This is little more than a means of changing things up, giving your muscles a slightly different stimulus to spark new muscle growth.

Each workout includes drop sets to increase intensity, but for only one set per bodypart, so as to avoid overtraining and muscle catabolism.

As a parting thought, we can’t emphasize enough the importance of consistency and staying focused. Your workouts shouldn’t be two-hour affairs—each visit to the gym needs to be fast-paced and intense.

With that as your guide and following the heavy-duty blueprint laid out here, we can’t promise it’ll be easy, but the results should be worth every drop of sweat.

Just think, 10 more muscular pounds may be a mere month away.

Source: https://www.muscleandfitness.com/workout-plan/workouts/workout-routines/gain-10-pounds-muscle-4-weeks-1/

Workout Routines for Men: The Ultimate Guide

How To Build Muscle: Use This Gym Training Plan

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When it comes to achieving your best physique, a proper strength training program is essential.

Whether you’re looking to transform your body or just kick your training up a notch, it’s important to add training volume (in the form of reps, sets, and weight) to stimulate new muscle growth as you progress.

In general, most beginners have been lifting for less than a year, intermediates for at least 1 year, and advanced trainees for at least 2 years. Keep in mind that advanced workouts should not be attempted unless you have appropriate strength training experience.

This article reviews several high-quality exercise regimens for men of all experience levels to maximize muscle and strength gains while ensuring adequate recovery.

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Whether you’re a seasoned expert or new to strength training, working out at home is a great option when you can’t get to the gym or need a change of pace.

The at-home workouts below require a limited amount of equipment. Plus, some of the movements can be substituted for bodyweight exercises in which you use your body’s own weight as resistance.

These exercises can serve as a weeklong beginner’s routine or cycled to provide several sessions per week for advanced trainees.

If your goal is weight loss, you can add a form of cardio, such as running or cycling, between sessions.

Equipment required: flat-weight bench, appropriate adjustable dumbbells your level of experience

If you’re just starting out you may want to get expert advice at a specialty store to select the right equipment, but if you know what you’re looking for, you can also purchase adjustable dumbbells online.

Rest intervals: 60–90 seconds

Share on PinterestPushups (from “Day 2: chest and back” workout below)

Day 3: arms and abs

Summary

This home workout routine includes all the exercises you need to make sizeable muscle and strength gains with minimal equipment.

Share on PinterestLateral raises (from “Day 1: full body” workout below)

Starting out in the gym can seem intimidating, but with proper guidance the process becomes more approachable — and even invigorating.

As a beginner, you can progress very quickly because almost any exercise promotes muscle and strength gains. Still, it’s important to avoid overexertion, which can lead to injuries or decreased performance.

This workout routine has you in the gym 3 days per week (such as Monday, Wednesday, and Friday), with full-body sessions completed each day. This allows you to get used to new movements, focus on proper form, and take time to recover.

You can add reps and sets as needed as you progress.

The beginner phase should last as long as you continue to improve. Some people may plateau at around 6 months, whereas others may continue to see results for over a year.

Equipment required: fully-equipped gym

Rest periods: 90–180 seconds for main movements, 60–90 seconds for accessories

Intensity: Select a weight that allows you to complete the prescribed reps while leaving about two solid reps in the tank.

Day 3: full body

Summary

This 3-day beginner program provides the full-body stimulus you need to gain muscle while allowing adequate recovery between sessions.

Share on PinterestOverhead press (from “Day 3: upper body” workout below)

After working hard in the gym for several months, it’s time to step your training up a notch to keep your gains coming.

At this point, you should have good exercise technique and be able to handle more weight on the bar.

This 4-day-per-week intermediate program increases reps and sets to stimulate new muscle growth. When they become too easy, you can gradually add more weight or more reps/sets.

If done right, you can follow this routine for several years until you reach an advanced level. It may be helpful to switch up your exercises on occasion to keep yourself engaged and prevent burnout.

Remember that soreness is not always an indicator of muscle growth. Now that you have some training experience, you may not get sore after every workout.

Equipment required: fully-equipped gym

Rest intervals: 90–180 seconds for main movements, 60–90 seconds for accessories

Intensity: Select a weight that allows you to complete the prescribed reps while leaving about two solid reps in the tank. To increase intensity, go to your limit on the last set.

Day 4: lower body

Summary

This 4-day, intermediate program adds additional sets and reps, as well as more complex exercises, to jumpstart new muscle growth.

Share on PinterestHanging leg raises (from “Legs B” workout below)

Additional volume (sets and reps) and intensity (weight on the bar) is essential for advanced gym-goers to keep gaining muscle. Keep in mind that this routine should not be attempted unless you’ve been training consistently for 2 or more years.

While the muscle gains won’t come as fast as they did when you were a beginner, there’s still room for significant progress at this stage.

This gruelling workout routine has you in the gym 6 days per week with 1 rest day in between. It follows a pull-push-legs pattern, hitting each muscle group twice per week, with supersets incorporated for maximum hypertrophy (muscle growth).

Again, you can increase weight on the bar, as well as sets and reps, from week to week to ensure continued progress while following this program.

Equipment required: fully-equipped gym

Rest periods: 90–180 seconds for main movements, 60–90 seconds for accessories

Intensity: Select a weight that allows you to complete the prescribed reps while leaving about 2 solid reps in the tank. To increase intensity, go to failure on the last set.

Supersets: Complete the initial set of the first movement immediately followed by the second movement. Repeat until all designated reps and sets are complete.

Legs B

Summary

This advanced program is incredibly intense and follows a push-pull-legs pattern for 6 days per week. Only attempt this program if you have several years of training under your belt.

As you age, muscle and bone mass decreases at a gradual rate. Nonetheless, you can counteract this loss by following a resistance training program to stimulate muscle and bone growth (1, 2).

The exercise routines outlined above still apply to people aged 40 and older, though some of the exercises may need to be replaced with more joint-friendly options — especially if you have any pre-existing injuries.

For example, you can do goblet squats instead of back squats or tricep pushdowns instead of dips.

Regardless of your age, it’s best to start with the beginner program and work your way up.

It’s also important not to work out too strenuously, as there’s an increased risk of injury as you age. You may wise need to extend recovery times to 2 days between workouts instead of 1, as your body takes more time to recuperate (3).

While exercise presents some obstacles for older adults, maintaining a proper resistance training program can provide endless benefits and keep you consistently in shape.

Summary

Trainees above the age of 40 may have to adjust their workout routine to account for injuries or slower recovery times. While muscle and bone mass decline as you age, you can combat this with proper exercise.

While working out in the gym provides the stimulus for muscle and strength gains, nutrition plays a major role in recovery and exercise optimization.

Thus, it’s important to ensure that your food intake is adequate to meet the demands of your training.

This can be done by ensuring sufficient calorie, protein, carb, and fat intake your training intensity and physique goals. You can use a calorie counter to calculate your needs.

In order to gain muscle, it’s best to be in a calorie surplus, or eat more than your body needs to sustain itself. A surplus of 10–20% over your baseline calorie needs should be sufficient to promote muscle gains (4).

If you’re trying to lose body fat instead, maintaining your baseline or adopting a slight calorie deficit is generally recommended (4).

Nutrient timing, which involves eating at specific times to yield results, may also be vital to maximize muscle gains. For example, many experts recommend eating a well-balanced meal or snack within 2 hours of a workout, ideally both before and after (5, 6).

If you want to ensure proper dietary intake or create an individualized plan to help you meet your goals, consider consulting a registered dietitian.

Summary

Proper nutrition is vital to exercise, as it provides your body with the necessary building blocks for gaining muscle and strength.

Whether you’re a new or seasoned gym-goer, workout routines catered to your experience level can help you progress towards your muscle and strength goals.

Over time, you may find that your body responds better to certain movements over others, allowing you to adapt your training accordingly.

A proper exercise regimen and good nutrition habits are the first steps to getting in the best shape of your life, no matter your level of experience.

If you have an underlying health condition, it’s always best to check with your healthcare provider before starting any exercise program.

Source: https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/workout-routine-for-men

The Science of How to Build Muscle: Full Guide

How To Build Muscle: Use This Gym Training Plan

Want to know how to build muscle as a woman? The exact same way a man does.

Here are two women with low enough body fat that you can clearly see their muscles:

The first woman is thin (look at the frailness of her arms) and the second woman is fit. 

(If you're looking for more inspiration, see here and here.)

Notice I’m not using the word “toned,” which isn’t a thing. When people use the word “toned,” they’re referring to the combination of (1) being thin enough that muscle definition is visible and (2) having muscles to begin with.

You might not want to get as muscular as the second woman, but getting just halfway there will still make a very noticeable difference in your physique. 

Women gain muscle as fast as men

Want to know how to build muscle as a woman? The same way men do. Not with body weight, but with heavy weight progression and going to the gym every couple days.

The limiting factor to how big you can get is the broadness of your skeleton (study). So if your body is on the smaller side (e.g. high school teenager), it will be impossible to reach the same maximum muscle mass as someone much bigger than you. In other words, the average woman will ultimately gain less muscle than the average man.

But this doesn't mean women reach their maximum muscle size at a slower rate. In fact, women develop muscle at the same rate as men (study, study, study). (Hat tip to Menno Henselmans for compiling this research.) The difference is that women start with less muscle mass on average and ultimately gain less.

Even if you have an above-average sized frame, don’t be concerned about “accidentally” building lots of muscle too quickly. You’ll notice muscle gains early enough in the process to avoid getting “bulky.”

Yes, men have more testosterone, but testosterone is less important to the female muscle development process. In fact, women benefit from higher levels of IGF1 growth hormone, which is critical to muscle growth (study, study). 

While there are fewer muscular women in the world, that’s ly a reflection of fewer women working to become very muscular. It’s not necessarily a reflection of it being more difficult for women to actually build muscle. You may have a hard time believing all this, so click on any of those studies to skim the research. 

It’s important you understand that you're not at a disadvantage when bodybuilding because thinking otherwise can deter your progress. For example, one study examined the opposite scenario, where men were tricked into thinking they were taking steroids when they weren’t, and they consequently lifted 350% more in weight (study, study)! 

This suggests your confidence in the gym plays a critical role in how much you can lift.

So the answer to “How do I build muscle as a woman?” is to overcome your doubt.

Getting a butt

No amount of aerobic activity, yoga, or calisthenics will build your butt (“glutes”). It's all about using heavy weight as per a proper bodybuilding program. Not aerobic bodyweight exercises. Those are a scam when it comes to building muscle mass.

Specifically, the squat exercises you'll be doing are responsible for building glutes.

There's otherwise no secret to training glutes. They respond just every other muscle — you exercise them with 8-10 reps and use heavier weight each workout.

Source: https://www.julian.com/guide/muscle/intro

A Four-Week Gym Routine To Get Big And Lean

How To Build Muscle: Use This Gym Training Plan

How much can you transform your torso in just four weeks? A lot – so long as you follow this 16-session training plan to the letter.

It’s been designed to work your chest and back muscles twice a week – which means your biceps and triceps also get a double whammy of workload – to completely push these major muscle groups outside their comfort zone so your body has no option but to repair the damage by building a bigger, stronger and more defined body. You’ll also hit all your other major muscles, including your legs, to increase your fat-burning potential so you can get bigger and leaner – fast.

How the plan works

In each of the four weeks of this 28-day plan you will train your chest and back twice. Sound a lot? It is! But in some plans you only hit each muscle group every seven days, which isn’t enough of a stimulus to force your body into making positive physique adaptations.

But in this plan, doubling up each week on chest and back exercises – and therefore also working your biceps and triceps twice a week, once directly and once indirectly – will provide all the stimulus your body needs to get bigger in less time. And fear not, your shoulders, abs and legs won’t miss out on the size and strength gains: they will still get enough dedicated time each week to allow them to grow bigger and stronger.

Simply do the workouts in order, sticking to the exercises, sets, reps, tempo (explained below) and rest periods detailed. The first work each week targets your chest and triceps, the second your back and biceps, the third your legs and chest, and the fourth your back and shoulders.

All four weekly workouts are made up of five moves, which you’ll perform as straight sets, so you’ll simply work through moves 1 to 5 in order. That’s it!

Tempo training

To get the full effect from these workouts, you need to stick to the four-digit tempo code for each exercise.

The first digit indicates how long in seconds you take to lower the weight, the second how long you pause at the bottom of the move, the third how long you take to lift the weight, and the final digit how long you pause at the top. X means that part of the move should be done explosively.

The accumulated time under tension increases your heart rate to burn fat and break down muscle tissue so it’s rebuilt bigger and stronger. Keep each rep smooth and controlled so your muscles – not momentum – do the work.

Diet tips

Even if you follow every step of the workout plan to the letter, you won’t see the results you want if you're not backing up your work in the gym in the kitchen. The obvious first steps are to cut down on fast food, takeaways and booze, and after that it’s all about getting your body the nutrients it needs to stay healthy and support your training regime.

A minimum of five portions of fruit and vegetables a day is a good place to start. More than that is even better, although keep your daily fruit portions to two. You should also ensure you’re getting 30g of fibre every day. Opt for wholegrain varieties where possible with your carbs to help on the fibre front.

Adequate protein intake is also essential, because it provides the fuel you need to repair and rebuild muscles after a tough workout. When training regularly you should aim to consume about 1.4-2g of protein per kilo of bodyweight per day.

You can use protein powder to help, but it’s not hard (and much tastier) to get that amount of protein from food if you’re eating the right stuff.

This guide to the best sources of protein will help, as will these run-downs of high-protein foods for vegetarians and vegans.

If it all sounds too much work when you’re visiting the gym four times a week, another option is to use a healthy meal delivery service.

These will deliver meals to your door that are tailored to your exact requirements, so all you have to do is stick them in the microwave.

It’s more expensive than meal planning and cooking for yourself, but less expensive than a Deliveroo habit – and it’s undoubtedly the most convenient way to support this training plan if you’re struggling to maintain a healthy diet.

Warm up

Before you start following the workouts below – or any kind of exercise – it’s crucial that you take the time needed to warm up correctly. Ahead of tackling any of the workouts in this plan we highly recommend trying this quick gym warm-up routine from Yasmin Saadi, director and personal trainer at The Fitting Rooms gym.

It involves doing seven set moves downward dog walk-outs and lunges with rotation that warm up muscles all over the body, then going into exercises that are specific to the workout you are about to do. The simplest way to do the latter is to scan through the workouts detailed below and then do one or two warm-up sets of each exercise using either very light dumbbells or an unloaded barbell.

You’ll reap the benefits of taking five to ten minutes to warm up correctly in the form of both a reduced risk of injury and improved performance during your workout. Try it once and when you smash your first few sets instead of struggling through them, you’ll never need to be convinced of the value of a proper warm-up again.

1 Bench press

Sets 5 Reps 10 Tempo 2010 Rest 60sec Lie on a flat bench holding a barbell with your hands slightly wider than shoulder-width apart. Brace your core, then lower the bar towards your chest. Press it back up to the start.

2 Triceps dip

Sets 5 Reps 6-10Tempo 2110 Rest 60sec Grip rings or parallel bars with your arms straight. Keeping your chest up, bend your elbows to lower your body as far as your shoulders allow. Press back up powerfully to return to the start.

3 Incline dumbbell press

Sets Reps 12-15 Tempo 2010 Rest 60sec Lie on an incline bench holding a dumbbell in each hand by your shoulders. Press the weights up until your arms are straight, then lower them back to the start under control.

4 Incline dumbbell flye

Sets 3Reps 12-15 Tempo 2010 Rest 60sec Lie on an incline bench holding a dumbbell in each hand above your face, with your palms facing and a slight bend in your elbows. Lower them to the sides, then bring them back to the top.

5 Triceps extension

Sets 3 Reps 12-15 Tempo 2010 Rest 60sec Stand tall holding a dumbbell over your head with both hands, arms straight. Keeping your chest up, lower the weight behind your head, then raise it back to the start.

1 Pull-up

Sets 5 Reps 6-10 Tempo 2011 Rest 60sec Hold a pull-up bar with an overhand grip, hands shoulder-width apart. Brace your core, then pull yourself up until your lower chest touches the bar. Lower until your arms are straight again.

2 Bent-over row

Sets 5 Reps 10 Tempo 2010 Rest 60sec Hold a barbell using an overhand grip, hands just outside your legs, and lean forward from the hips. Bend your knees slightly and brace your core, then pull the bar up, leading with your elbows. Lower it back to the start.

3 Chin-up

Sets 3Reps 6-10 Tempo 2011 Rest 60sec Hold a pull-up bar with hands shoulder-width apart, palms facing you. Brace your core, then pull yourself up until your chin is over the bar. Lower until your arms are straight again.

4 Standing biceps curl

Sets 3Reps 12-15 Tempo 2011 Rest 60sec Stand with dumbbells by your sides, palms facing forwards. Keeping your elbows tucked in, curl the weights up, squeezing your biceps at the top. Lower them back to the start.

5 Seated incline curl

Sets 3 Reps 12-15 Tempo 2011 Rest 60sec Sit on an incline bench with dumbbells by your sides, palms facing forwards. Keeping your elbows tucked in, curl the weights up, squeezing your biceps at the top. Lower them back to the start.

1 Back squat

Sets 5 Reps 10 Tempo 2010 Rest 60sec Stand tall, holding a bar across the back of your shoulders. Keeping your chest up and core braced, squat down as deep as you can. Drive back up through your heels to return to the start.

2 Good morning

Sets 5 Reps 10 Tempo 2010 Rest 60sec Stand tall holding a light barbell across the backs of your shoulders, feet shoulder-width apart. With your core braced, bend forwards slowly from the hips, as far as your hamstrings allow but not past horizontal. Return to the start.

3 Glute bridge

Sets 3 Reps 12-15 Tempo 2011 Rest 60sec Sit with your upper back supported on a bench, holding a barbell across the tops of your thighs. Thrust your hips up, squeeze your glutes at the top, and then return to the start.

4 Incline dumbbell press

Sets 3 Reps 12-15 Tempo 2110 Rest 60sec Lie on an incline bench, holding a dumbbell in each hand by your shoulders. Press the weights up until your arms are straight, then lower them back to the start under control.

5 Incline dumbbell flye

Sets 3 Reps 12-15 Tempo 2111 Rest 60sec Lie on an incline bench, holding a dumbbell in each hand above your face, with your palms facing and a slight bend in your elbows. Lower them to the sides, then bring them back to the top.

1 Overhead press

Sets 5 Reps 10 Tempo 2010 Rest 60sec

Hold a bar in front of your neck with your hands just wider than shoulder-width apart. Keeping your chest up and core braced, press the bar overhead until your arms are straight. Lower it back to the start.

2 Rack pull

Sets 5 Reps 10 Tempo 2111 Rest 60sec

Stand tall in front of a barbell resting on safety bars at knee height. Bend and grasp the bar with an overhand grip, then stand up until your back is straight again, squeezing your shoulder blades together at the top.

3 Seated dumbbell press

Sets 3 Reps 12-15 Tempo 2010 Rest 60sec

Sit on an upright bench with a dumbbell in each hand at shoulder height. Keeping your chest up, press the weights directly overhead until your arms are straight, then lower them back to the start.

4 Lateral raise

Sets 3 Reps 12-15 Tempo 2011 Rest 60sec

Stand tall, holding a light dumbbell in each hand with palms facing. Keeping your chest up and a bend in your elbows, raise the weights out to shoulder height, then lower back to the start.

5 Reverse flye

Sets 3 Reps 12-15 Tempo 2011 Rest 60sec

Bend forward from the hips holding a light dumbbell in each hand with palms facing. Keeping a slight bend in your elbows, raise the weights out to shoulder height, then lower back to the start.

What Next?

Ready to take your training to the next level? The team at the New Body Plan can help. Their training and nutrition plans can transform your body in just eight weeks.

Start today | £69, use code coach20 for an exclusive £20 discount

Source: https://www.coachmag.co.uk/full-body-workouts/6179/a-four-week-gym-routine-to-get-big-and-lean

How to build muscle quickly

How To Build Muscle: Use This Gym Training Plan

The food choices you make will be a very important element of your success in gaining muscle.

Firstly, you’ll need to make sure that you have a calorie surplus available to generate new muscle. If you consume only the amount of calories you need to maintain your existing lean muscle mass, you may get stronger but there just won’t be enough spare resources to generate new muscle fibre.

You can work out the amount of calories you need by first establishing your basal metabolic rate using the following formula:

BMR = 66 + (13.8 x weight in kg) + (5 x height in cm) – (6.8 x age in years)

To this base rate, you'll need to add the amount of calories you believe you expended during your workout, plus an extra 200-400 calories. This should give you adequate caloric resources available to create new muscle without the risk of significant fat gain.

Protein intake is also very important. You’ll need to keep your overall intake high, and preferably originating from good quality sources (fresh meat, nuts, whey protein). The recommended protein consumption is 0.7g of protein per pound of bodyweight. This should keep your protein synthesis positive.

Supplementation

Taking supplements can contribute to your efforts to gain muscle, though it is by no means essential. Let’s take a brief look at some of the major players:

Whey Protein. Whey offers an efficient method to consume a very high quality source of protein. Whey is just an alternative to food really, but it does prove a cost effective and convenient option when considering your dietary logistics.

ZMA. People have differing opinions about ZMA. Personally, I find it brings about a marked increase in the quality of my sleep (though crazy dreams are sometimes a side effect). I also feel that it enhances my natural testosterone production. I have more aggression in the gym and my libido is noticeably raised when supplementing with ZMA.

ZMA may help boost hormone profiles but it is certainly not a steroid or anything of that nature, it's merely a combination of zinc magnesium and vitamin B6. I’ve also heard plenty of anecdotal evidence that ZMA doesn't do anything noticeable for a lot of people, so it's probably best treated with a healthy dose of scepticism

Creatine. Creatine works by increasing the amount of Adenosine Triphosphate (commonly known as ATP) available to an athlete during training. ATP is involved in engergy transfer at a cellular level, so it is linked to performance. Water is also drawn into the cells when supplementing with creatine, allowing enhanced nutrient delivery to help muscle growth.

Personally, I steer away from creatine because the cell hydration is quite significant, giving a bit of a watery look, and I prefer to maintain more a more ‘dry’ physique. There have also been some health warnings regarding creatine: it’s not a new product, but equally we haven't really observed safe usage over multiple generations. Proper research prior to usage is always recommended.

Rest

Source: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/health-fitness/body/build-muscle-quickly/