Supplements

Contents
  1. What You Need to Know about Dietary Supplements
  2. What are dietary supplements?
  3. What are the benefits of dietary supplements?
  4. Are there any risks in taking supplements?
  5. Some Common Dietary Supplements
  6. Who is responsible for the safety of dietary supplements?
  7. How can I find out more about the dietary supplement I’m taking?
  8. How can I be a smart supplement shopper?
  9. Report Problems to FDA
  10. Dietary Supplements
  11. Are Dietary Supplements Safe?
  12. Supplements Claiming to be Cures
  13. Claims that one product does it all and cures a wide variety of health problems
  14. Suggestions the product can treat or cure diseases
  15. Words scientific breakthrough, miraculous cure, exclusive product, secret ingredient, or ancient remedy
  16. Misleading use of scientific-sounding terms
  17. Phony references to Nobel Prize winning technology or science
  18. Undocumented testimonials by patients or doctors claiming miraculous results
  19. Limited availability and a need to pay in advance
  20. Promises of no-risk “money-back guarantees
  21. Tainted Products
  22. How to Report a Potential Problem
  23. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)
  24. Vitamins, Minerals and Nutritional Supplements: Diet
  25. Color Rules
  26. Vitamins in the News
  27. The Calcium Connection
  28. Food or Pills?
  29. The Basics
  30. Should I Take a Dietary Supplement?
  31. What If I’m Over 50?
  32. What Are Antioxidants?
  33. What About Herbal Supplements?
  34. What’s Best for Me?
  35. What Can I Do to Stay Healthy?
  36. For More Information About Dietary Supplements
  37. 6 Supplements Everyone Should Be Taking
  38. Supplements
  39. Key Nutrients to Complete Your Diet
  40. Finding Supplements to Meet Your Needs
  41. Strategies for Supplementing Safely
  42. independent tests and reviews of vitamin, mineral, and herbal supplements

What You Need to Know about Dietary Supplements

Supplements

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Dietary Supplements can be beneficial to your health — but taking supplements can also involve health risks. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) does not have the authority to review dietary supplement products for safety and effectiveness before they are marketed.

You’ve heard about them, may have used them, and may have even recommended them to friends or family. While some dietary supplements are well understood and established, others need further study. Read on for important information for you and your family about dietary supplements.

Before making decisions about whether to take a supplement, talk to your healthcare provider. They can help you achieve a balance between the foods and nutrients you personally need.

What are dietary supplements?

Dietary supplements include such ingredients as vitamins, minerals, herbs, amino acids, and enzymes. Dietary supplements are marketed in forms such as tablets, capsules, softgels, gelcaps, powders, and liquids.

What are the benefits of dietary supplements?

Some supplements can help assure that you get enough of the vital substances the body needs to function; others may help reduce the risk of disease. But supplements should not replace complete meals which are necessary for a healthful diet – so, be sure you eat a variety of foods as well.

Un drugs, supplements are not permitted to be marketed for the purpose of treating, diagnosing, preventing, or curing diseases. That means supplements should not make disease claims, such as “lowers high cholesterol” or “treats heart disease.” Claims these cannot be legitimately made for dietary supplements.

Are there any risks in taking supplements?

Yes. Many supplements contain active ingredients that have strong biological effects in the body. This could make them unsafe in some situations and hurt or complicate your health. For example, the following actions could lead to harmful – even life-threatening – consequences.

  • Combining supplements
  • Using supplements with medicines (whether prescription or over-the-counter)
  • Substituting supplements for prescription medicines
  • Taking too much of some supplements, such as vitamin A, vitamin D, or iron Some supplements can also have unwanted effects before, during, and after surgery. So, be sure to inform your healthcare provider, including your pharmacist about any supplements you are taking.

Some Common Dietary Supplements

  • Calcium
  • Echinacea
  • Fish Oil
  • Ginseng
  • Glucosamine and/or
  • Chondroitin Sulphate
  • Garlic
  • Vitamin D
  • St. John’s Wort
  • Saw Palmetto
  • Ginkgo
  • Green Tea

Note: These examples do not represent either an endorsement or approval by FDA.

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Who is responsible for the safety of dietary supplements?

FDA is not authorized to review dietary supplement products for safety and effectiveness before they are marketed.

The manufacturers and distributors of dietary supplements are responsible for making sure their products are safe BEFORE they go to market.

If the dietary supplement contains a NEW ingredient, manufacturers must notify FDA about that ingredient prior to marketing. However, the notification will only be reviewed by FDA (not approved) and only for safety, not effectiveness.

Manufacturers are required to produce dietary supplements in a quality manner and ensure that they do not contain contaminants or impurities, and are accurately labeled according to current Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP) and labeling regulations.

If a serious problem associated with a dietary supplement occurs, manufacturers must report it to FDA as an adverse event. FDA can take dietary supplements off the market if they are found to be unsafe or if the claims on the products are false and misleading.

How can I find out more about the dietary supplement I’m taking?

Dietary supplement labels must include name and location information for the manufacturer or distributor.

If you want to know more about the product that you are taking, check with the manufacturer or distributor about:

  • Information to support the claims of the product
  • Information on the safety and effectiveness of the ingredients in the product.

How can I be a smart supplement shopper?

Be a savvy supplement user. Here’s how:

  • When searching for supplements on the internet, use noncommercial sites (e.g. NIH, FDA, USDA) rather than depending on information from sellers.
  • If claims sound too good to be true, they probably are. Be mindful of product claims such as “works better than [a prescription drug],” “totally safe,” or has “no side effects.”
  • Be aware that the term natural doesn’t always means safe.
  • Ask your healthcare provider if the supplement you’re considering would be safe and beneficial for you.
  • Always remember – safety first!

Report Problems to FDA

Notify FDA if the use of a dietary supplement caused you or a family member to have a serious reaction or illness (even if you are not certain that the product was the cause or you did not visit a doctor or clinic).

Follow these steps:

  1. Stop using the product.
  2. Contact your healthcare provider to find out how to take care of the problem.
  3. Report problems to FDA in either of these ways:

Learn more about dietary supplements.

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Source: https://www.fda.gov/food/buy-store-serve-safe-food/what-you-need-know-about-dietary-supplements

Dietary Supplements

Supplements

Dietary supplements may seem harmless health boosters. But while some have proven benefits, many don't.

Un drugs, dietary supplements aren't evaluated or reviewed by FDA for safety and effectiveness, and even “natural” supplements can be risky depending on the medicines you take or the medical conditions you have.

In recent years, hundreds of supplements also have been found to be tainted with drugs and other chemicals. Always talk to your doctor before you take a new supplement, and avoid any supplement claiming it's a “cure.”

Produced in cooperation with the Food and Drug Administration

Dietary supplements include:

Dietary Supplement Ads
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  • vitamins and minerals
  • amino acids
  • enzymes
  • herbs
  • animal extracts
  • probiotics

They come in a number of forms, including capsules, liquids, and powders. But while dietary supplements might seem similar to drugs, and some even have drug- effects, there's a big difference: Dietary supplements don't undergo FDA review for safety and effectiveness before they're sold.

Are Dietary Supplements Safe?

Dietary supplements aren't always safe or harmless. Even “natural” supplements can be risky for people on certain medicines or with certain medical conditions, and some supplements have been found to be tainted with drugs or other chemicals. See Tainted Products.

Even “traditional remedies” with a long history of use aren't guaranteed to be safe in all cases.

Substances for which safety concerns have been raised include:

  • comfrey
  • chaparral
  • lobelia
  • germander
  • aristolochia
  • ephedra (ma huang)
  • L-tryptophan
  • germanium
  • magnolia-stephania
  • stimulant laxative ingredients, those found in dieter's teas

Comfrey, for example, contains certain alkaloids that can cause serious liver damage, and aristolochia can cause kidney failure.

Even some vitamins and minerals, when taken in inappropriate amounts, can cause problems. For example, too much vitamin A can reduce bone mineral density, cause birth defects, and lead to liver damage, according to the National Academy of Sciences.

Always read labels and package inserts and follow product directions. But remember that dietary supplement labels and ingredients aren't evaluated by FDA before they're sold. Check with your health care professional — your best and most important source on whether a supplement is safe for you.

For a list of the dietary supplement ingredients for which FDA has issued alerts, visit FDA's website.

Supplements Claiming to be Cures

Promises for a quick cure or solution for a serious health problem may be hard to resist — but supplements claiming to shrink tumors, cure insomnia, cure impotency, treat Alzheimer's disease, or prevent severe memory loss aren't proven. Besides cheating you your money, they also may hurt your health.

Under Federal law, dietary supplements can't be promoted for the treatment of a disease because they aren't proven to be safe and effective.

Treat weight loss products with suspicion, too. Claims that you can eat all you want and still lose weight effortlessly just aren't true. To lose weight — and keep it off — you have to eat fewer calories and increase your activity.

Other tip-offs to a fraud include:

Claims that one product does it all and cures a wide variety of health problems

“Proven to treat rheumatism, arthritis, infections, prostate problems, ulcers, cancer, heart trouble, hardening of the arteries and more.”

Suggestions the product can treat or cure diseases

“Shrinks tumors,” “Cures impotency,” or “Prevents severe memory loss.”

Words scientific breakthrough, miraculous cure, exclusive product, secret ingredient, or ancient remedy

“A revolutionary innovation formulated by using proven principles of natural health-based medical science.”

Misleading use of scientific-sounding terms

“Molecule multiplicity,” “glucose metabolism,” “thermogenesis,” or “insulin receptor sites.”

Phony references to Nobel Prize winning technology or science

“Nobel Prize Winning Technology,” or “Developed by two times Nobel prize winner.”

Undocumented testimonials by patients or doctors claiming miraculous results

“My husband has Alzheimer's disease. He began eating a teaspoonful of this product each day. And now, in just 22 days, he mowed the grass, cleaned out the garage, weeded the flower beds, and we take our morning walk again.”

Limited availability and a need to pay in advance

“Hurry. This offer will not last. Send us a check now to reserve your supply.”

Promises of no-risk “money-back guarantees

“If after 30 days you have not lost at least 4 pounds each week, your uncashed check will be returned to you.”

What kinds of claims can companies make on food and supplement labels? FDA-approved claims:

  • Must be significant scientific evidence that shows a strong link between a food substance and a disease or health condition.
  • Can state only that a food substance reduces the risk of certain health problems — not that it can treat or cure a disease. For example: “Calcium may reduce the risk of the bone disease osteoporosis. “

Dietary supplements also can carry claims about the effect of a substance on maintaining the body's normal structure or function — “Product B promotes healthy joints and bones” — but must include the disclaimer: “This statement has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent disease.”

Learn more at FDA's website.

Tainted Products

In the last few years, FDA has discovered hundreds of “dietary supplements” containing drugs or other chemicals, particularly in products for weight loss, sexual enhancement, or bodybuilding.

The “extra ingredients” generally aren't listed on the label, but could cause serious side effects or interact in dangerous ways with medicines or other supplements you're taking. People have suffered strokes, acute liver injury, kidney failure, and pulmonary embolisms (artery blockage in the lung); some people have died.

Tainted supplements often are sold with false and misleading claims “100% natural” and “safe.” To recognize tainted products, look for:

  • products claiming to be alternatives to FDA-approved drugs or have effects similar to prescription drugs
  • products claiming to be legal alternatives to anabolic steroids
  • marketing materials primarily in a foreign language
  • promises of rapid effects or results

Find more on tainted products marketed as dietary supplements at FDA's website.

Health Fraud
FDA resources to help you avoid health fraud.

Dietary Supplements
An overview of dietary supplements and other consumer information from FDA.

Buying Medicines and Medical Products Online
Tips and precautions for buying medical products online from FDA.

Office of Dietary Supplements
Information from the National Institutes of Health about dietary supplements.

How to Report a Potential Problem

To report a health product you believe is advertised falsely, contact the FTC. You also can contact your state Attorney General's office, your state department of health, or your local consumer protection agency.

To report a fraudulently labeled product, call your local FDA office.

To report an adverse reaction or illness that may be related to the use of a supplement or other health care product, call a doctor or other health care provider immediately. You also may want to report your reaction or illness to FDA MedWatch. Call 1-800-FDA-1088 (1-800-332-1088) to request a report form, or file a complaint online. Patients' names are kept confidential.

Food and Drug Administration (FDA)

FDA regulates over $1 trillion worth of products, which account for 25 cents of every dollar spent annually by American consumers. It is part of FDA's job to see that the food we eat is safe and wholesome, and that the medicines and medical devices we use are safe and effective. For more information, call toll-free, 1-888-INFO-FDA (1-888-463-6332), or visit www.fda.gov.

Source: https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/articles/0261-dietary-supplements

Vitamins, Minerals and Nutritional Supplements: Diet

Supplements

Good nutrition is much more than something to fill your stomach — what you eat can affect your health, energy, and well-being in so many ways.

The most important feature of a good diet is variety. We all know variety is the spice of life, but did you realize that unless you eat a wide variety of foods, you may be missing out on important vitamins, minerals, and other nutrients? Eating the right mix of vitamins and minerals will help you feel and look your best at any age.

Color Rules

To make sure your eating plan contains all the nutrients you need, choose a rainbow of colorful foods. The pigments that give foods their color are also the nutritious substances that can reduce your risk of cancer and chronic diseases heart disease.

Of course, foods with the most “pigment power” are mostly fruits and vegetables — yet another reason to fill your plate with these fiber-filled, low-calorie, fat-free, super foods! Eaten together, fruits and vegetables pack an even bigger punch in reducing free radicals — unstable molecules in the body that damage cells and are thought to contribute to the development of many diseases.

Vitamins in the News

The hottest vitamins these days are the antioxidants (E, C, and A, along with the mineral selenium) and the “sunshine” vitamin, also known as vitamin D.

Antioxidants help gobble up those nasty free radicals. A diet rich in antioxidants has been linked to a host of health-promoting, disease-fighting activities in the body.

Antioxidant-rich foods include:

  • Vitamin A and beta-carotene: pumpkin, squash, carrots, spinach, sweet potatoes, cantaloupes, dark leafy greens, and mangoes
  • Vitamin C: citrus fruits, strawberries, bell peppers, cauliflower, broccoli, tomatoes, sweet potatoes, and asparagus
  • Vitamin E: vegetable oil, almonds, whole grains, wheat germ, sweet potatoes, and yams
  • Selenium: salmon and haddock

Vitamin D has been in the news lately as studies have shown that people living in northern latitudes (such as much of the northern U.S.) may not get enough of this nutrient.

Without adequate vitamin D, your body can't properly absorb calcium, leading to a higher risk of broken bones — especially in the elderly.

A recent Swiss study suggests that elderly folks may be able to reduce their risk of injury from falls with vitamin D supplementation.

The best source of this nutrient is sunshine. Other good sources include:

  • Fortified milk and some orange juices. Juice manufacturers are now adding both calcium and vitamin D for better absorption.
  • Salmon and mackerel
  • Eggs
  • Liver

Vitamin D Deficiency: How Much Vitamin D Is Enough? See Slideshow

The Calcium Connection

Calcium is also the super-nutrient for keeping bones and teeth strong and preventing osteoporosis. The best sources of calcium are dairy foods, though it's also found in

  • dark leafy greens and
  • fortified products cereal and orange juice.

Food or Pills?

Supplements are not the secret weapon to better health, nor can they make up for a poor diet. While vitamin and mineral pills can help round out a healthy diet, they cannot take the place of the many nutrients and fiber found in whole foods.

At the WebMD Weight Loss Clinic, we recommend taking a daily multivitamin and mineral supplement for nutritional “insurance.” Depending on your food choices, even the best eating plans can fall short of meeting all your nutritional needs.

Taking a daily multivitamin/mineral supplement is safe and may offer additional health benefits. According to a study published in the August 2003 Journal of Nutrition, a daily multivitamin can reduce your risk of having a first heart attack.

Other studies have suggested that daily supplements can help maintain good health and reduce the risk of chronic disease.

But remember that more is not always better: When you are choosing your daily multivitamin/mineral, make sure it contains no more than 100% of the Recommended Dietary Allowance for any nutrient.

It's a much better idea to get your nutrients from food and take a simple vitamin/mineral supplement once per day — unless your physician recommends otherwise. (Keep in mind that that certain health conditions, such as pregnancy, call for specific supplements, so check with your doctor if you have health issues.)

The Basics

Every day, scientists are discovering substances in food that promote health and protect against diseases. As time goes on, they will ly uncover even more exciting links between nutrients and health.

In the meantime, here are some basic things we know for sure about vitamins and minerals:

  • Vitamins and minerals have no calories.
  • All vitamins and minerals can be found in foods.
  • If your diet has too little of a vitamin or mineral over a long period of time, you will develop a deficiency.
  • The best form of most vitamins and minerals is the kind you get from food.

So go ahead: Add any or all of the foods mentioned in this article to your grocery list. Choosing foods and beverages that are loaded with vitamins, minerals, and other healthful substances will help satisfy hunger, ward off chronic diseases, and keep a zip in your step.

Originally published Mar. 3, 2004.
Medically updated July 3, 2008.

SOURCES: Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, February 2002. Journal of Nutrition, August 2003. The Journal of the American Medical Association 2002; 287. The New England Journal of Medicine, 2001; 345.

©2004 WebMD Inc. All rights reserved.

Next to red peppers, you can get the most vitamin C from ________________. See Answer

Source: https://www.medicinenet.com/vitamins_minerals_and_nutritional_supplements/article.htm

Should I Take a Dietary Supplement?

Eating a variety of healthy foods is the best way to get the nutrients you need. However, some people don’t get enough vitamins and minerals from their daily diet, and their doctors may recommend a supplement. Dietary supplements may provide nutrients that might be missing from your daily diet.

Talk with your doctor before taking any supplements. Some supplements can change how medicines you may already be taking will work. If your doctor recommends a dietary supplement for you, make sure you’re getting the brand recommended by the doctor and that you take it as directed.

Do you wonder if you need a dietary supplement? Maybe you do, but usually not. Ask yourself why you think you might want to take a dietary supplement.

Are you concerned about getting enough nutrients? Is a friend, a neighbor, or someone on a commercial suggesting you take one? Some ads for dietary supplements in magazines, online, or on TV seem to promise that these supplements will make you feel better, keep you from getting sick, or even help you live longer.

Often, there is little, if any, good scientific research supporting these claims. Supplements may cost a lot, could be harmful, or simply might not be helpful. Talk to your doctor or a registered dietitian for advice.

What If I’m Over 50?

People over age 50 may need more of some vitamins and minerals than younger adults do. Your doctor or a dietitian can tell you whether you need to change your diet or take a vitamin or mineral supplement to get enough of these:

  • Calcium. Calcium works with vitamin D to keep bones strong at all ages. Bone loss can lead to fractures in both older women and men. Calcium is found in milk and milk products (fat-free or low-fat is best), canned fish with soft bones, dark-green leafy vegetables kale, and foods with calcium added, breakfast cereals.
  • Vitamin D. Most people’s bodies make enough vitamin D if they are in the sun for 15 to 30 minutes at least twice a week. But, if you are older, you may not be able to get enough vitamin D that way. Try adding vitamin D-fortified milk and milk products, vitamin D-fortified cereals, and fatty fish to your diet, and/or use a vitamin D supplement.
  • Vitamin B6. This vitamin is needed to form red blood cells. It is found in potatoes, bananas, chicken breasts, and fortified cereals.
  • Vitamin B12.Vitamin B12 helps keep your red blood cells and nerves healthy. While older adults need just as much vitamin B12 as other adults, some have trouble absorbing the vitamin naturally found in food. If you have this problem, your doctor may recommend that you eat foods fortified cereals that have this vitamin added, or use a B12 supplement.

The Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2015-2020 recommend how much of each vitamin and mineral men and women of different ages need. Sometimes, too much of a vitamin or mineral can be harmful. Most, if not all, of your daily vitamins and minerals should come from food.

Vitamin B12—2.4 mcg (micrograms) each day. If you are taking medicine for acid reflux, you might need a different form, which your healthcare provider can give you.

Calcium—Women over age 50 need 1,200 mg (milligrams) each day. Men need 1,000 mg between age 51 and 70 and 1,200 mg after 70, but not more than 2,000 mg a day.

Vitamin D—600 IU (International Units) for people age 51 to 70 and 800 IU for those over 70, but not more than 4,000 IU each day.

Vitamin B6—1.7 mg for men and 1.5 mg for women each day.

When thinking about whether you need more of a vitamin or mineral, think about how much of each nutrient you get from food and drinks, as well as from any supplements you take. Check with a doctor or dietitian to learn whether you need to supplement your diet.

What Are Antioxidants?

You might hear about antioxidants in the news. These are natural substances in food that might help protect you from some diseases. Here are some common sources of antioxidants that you should be sure to include in your diet:

  • Beta-carotene—Fruits and vegetables that are either dark green or dark orange
  • Selenium—Seafood, liver, meat, and grains
  • Vitamin C—Citrus fruits, peppers, tomatoes, and berries
  • Vitamin E—Wheat germ, nuts, sesame seeds, and canola, olive, and peanut oils

Right now, research results suggest that large doses of supplements with antioxidants will not prevent chronic diseases such as heart disease or diabetes. In fact, some studies have shown that taking large doses of some antioxidants could be harmful. Again, it is best to check with your doctor before taking a dietary supplement.

What About Herbal Supplements?

Herbal supplements are dietary supplements that come from plants.

A few that you may have heard of are gingko biloba, ginseng, echinacea, and black cohosh. Researchers are looking at using herbal supplements to prevent or treat some health problems. It’s too soon to know if herbal supplements are both safe and useful. But, studies of some have not shown benefits.

What’s Best for Me?

If you are thinking about using dietary supplements:

  • Learn. Find out as much as you can about any dietary supplement you might take. Talk with your doctor, your pharmacist, or a registered dietitian. A supplement that seemed to help your neighbor might not work for you. If you are reading fact sheets or checking websites, be aware of the source of the information. Could the writer or group profit from the sale of a particular supplement? Read more about choosing reliable health information websites.
  • Remember. Just because something is said to be “natural” doesn’t mean it is safe or good for you. It could have side effects. It might make a medicine your doctor prescribed for you either weaker or stronger. It could also be harmful to you if you have certain medical conditions.
  • Tell your doctor. He or she needs to know if you decide to use a dietary supplement. Do not diagnose or treat any health condition without first checking with your doctor. Learn how medications can interact with dietary supplements. For more information, visit the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health.
  • Buy wisely. Choose brands that your doctor, dietitian, or pharmacist recommend. Don’t buy dietary supplements with ingredients you don’t need. Don’t assume that more is better. It is possible to waste money on unneeded supplements.
  • Check the science. Make sure any claim about a dietary supplement is scientific proof. The company making the dietary supplement should be able to send you information on the safety and/or effectiveness of the ingredients in a product, which you can then discuss with your doctor. Remember, if something sounds too good to be true, it probably is.

What Can I Do to Stay Healthy?

When she turned 60, Pearl decided she wanted to stay healthy and active as long as possible. She was careful about what she ate. She became more physically active. Now she takes a long, brisk walk three or four times a week.

In bad weather, she joins the mall walkers at the local shopping mall. On nice days, Pearl works in her garden. When she was younger, Pearl stopped smoking and started using a seatbelt. She’s even learning how to use a computer to find healthy recipes.

Last month, she turned 84 and danced at her granddaughter’s wedding!

Try following Pearl’s example—stick to a healthy diet, be physically active, keep your mind active, don’t smoke, see your doctor regularly, and, in most cases, only use dietary supplements suggested by your doctor or pharmacist.

Read about this topic in Spanish. Lea sobre este tema en español.

For More Information About Dietary Supplements

Federal Trade Commission1-877-382-4357 (toll-free)1-866-653-4261 (TTY/toll-free)

www.consumer.ftc.gov

MedlinePlusNational Library of Medicine      

www.medlineplus.gov

This content is provided by the National Institute on Aging (NIA), part of the National Institutes of Health. NIA scientists and other experts review this content to ensure that it is accurate, authoritative, and up to date.

Content reviewed: November 30, 2017

Source: https://www.nia.nih.gov/health/dietary-supplements

6 Supplements Everyone Should Be Taking

Supplements

Holisitic Medicine July 5, 2017 at 12:27 pm

Taking supplements has become a very popular way of treating illness naturally by giving our bodies the nutrients they need to function properly. But with so many supplements on the market today, it can be hard to know what they all treat and which ones are really worth taking.

To help you out, we’ve compiled a list of the top six supplements that almost everyone can take to improve their health. However, it’s still a good idea to check with a health care professional before taking any supplements to make sure you’re taking the right supplements at the right dosage.

  1. Multivitamin
    In theory, we should be able to get all of our nutrients from our diet. But in today’s society, where most of our food is either processed or washed and cleaned, we are missing many essential nutrients we used to get from the soil, so even the healthiest eaters might not be getting all of the nutrients they need. That’s why taking a good multivitamin every day is so important. Look for one that contains vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin E, magnesium, calcium, and vitamins B1, B2, B6, and B12 – all of which can help boost your immune system and give you more energy during the day.
  2. Fish Oil
    Having a healthy heart is important, and taking a daily dose of fish oil is one of the easiest things you can do to protect it. Studies have shown that fish oil can lower blood pressure, reduce blood clotting, and decrease your chance of having a fatal heart attack. Plus, fish oil is a great source of Omega 3 fatty acids, which serve to decrease inflammation, boost your immune system, and can even have a positive effect on depression and mood.
  3. Magnesium
    Did you know that about 80 percent of adults suffer from a magnesium deficiency? Magnesium plays a critical role in many functions in the body, including nerve transmission, muscle contraction, energy production, bone and cell production and more. Taking a daily magnesium supplement can help with a variety of conditions including asthma, migraine headaches, muscle cramping, osteoporosis, heart disease, and can even help to calm your nerves and reduce anxiety.
  4. Vitamin D3
    Don’t want to catch a cold? Taking a daily dose of vitamin D3 can help. In a perfect world, we would get enough vitamin D by exposure to sunlight, but since we now spend most of our time indoors (with clothes on), it’s crucial that we get vitamin D from other sources. Vitamin D not only helps with the absorption of calcium and phosphorus into our blood stream, and a vitamin D deficiency can reduce your ability to heal from infections and can be a risk factor in developing an autoimmune disease.
  5. Probiotics
    You may think that bacteria is bad, but in your gut, bacteria is actually good. With all the antimicrobial soaps and cleaners and antibiotics we are exposed to, our digestive tract is often not getting the right kind of bacteria to keep it in balance. Probiotics are living microorganisms that promote good gut health, which can strengthen your immune system, improve digestion, reduce your chances of getting colds or the flu, and help cure irritable bowel disease. Try to get more probiotics in your diet by eating probiotic yogurt or kefir, or by adding a probiotic supplement.
  6. Tumeric/Curcumin
    When it comes to fighting inflammation, almost nothing does it better than turmeric. This common yellow spice contains curcumin, a phyto-chemical capable of inhibiting inflammation – which can lead to diseases such as heart disease, stroke, diabetes, headaches and chronic fatigue — and fighting cancer. It’s an especially great supplement to take if you suffer from any joint pain or arthritis.

Interested in learning more about which other supplements can help you for your specific issues? Come to our Brown Bag Supplements Workshop on July 17 at noon, where you can spend 10-15 minutes with one of our practitioners and get specific feedback on the supplements that are right for you. $15 per person or free if you bring a friend. Lunch is on us!

Source: http://holistic-medicine.com/6-supplements-everyone-taking/

Supplements

Supplements

Vitamins and minerals are considered essential nutrients because they cannot be produced by the body and are vital to your survival. Other types of nutrients found in foods also perform important functions, but there are no daily recommended nutritional guidelines that stipulate precisely how much you should include in your diet.

If you suffer from certain medical concerns or have dietary restrictions, you still could benefit from a supplement product that contains these nutrients. Supplements may also contain natural chemicals that your body produces on its own. These products are made to increase your supply of the chemicals that may help with symptoms of a health concern such as lack of energy.

However, more research is necessary to establish these benefits.

Key Nutrients to Complete Your Diet

If you're concerned about your diet and possible deficiencies, there are many products available to help supplement the nutrients you receive from meals and snacks. Amino acid supplements supply the body with one or more of the key building blocks for proteins and are often used by athletes and others who have an increased need for protein in their diets.

Iron supplements provide additional levels of the mineral needed to produce an important component of the blood that helps carry oxygen through the body.

Antioxidant supplements alpha lipoic acid, co-enzyme Q10, astaxanthin and resveratrol may help to protect the body from the effects of free radicals, which have been linked to heart disease, cancer, macular degeneration and aging of the skin and the organs.

Finding Supplements to Meet Your Needs

Walgreens has an array of supplements that you can use to improve your diet and address symptoms of illness and disease. The menu on the left can guide you to all of the supplements of one particular type to make shopping easy.

The collection includes supplements that are traditionally used for joint health glucosamine as well as supplements that some researchers believe help balance brain chemicals SAM-e and 5HTP.

You'll also find products for use in cleanses and other solutions to complete your healthy lifestyle in the supplements collection.

Strategies for Supplementing Safely

While research has established many potential benefits from the use of supplements, not everyone can safely use certain dietary supplements.

To help avoid any unpleasant side effects, serious health complications or interactions with medicines and other supplements, involve your doctor in your supplementation plan. Discuss your health concerns with your physician and explain what you hope to gain from using a supplement product.

Your doctor can provide guidance, let you know if a particular product is safe for you and help you determine what the ideal dosage is for your unique needs.

This summary is intended for general informational purposes only, and should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration does not strictly regulate herbs and supplements. There is no guarantee of purity, strength, or safety of the products. As a result, effects may vary. You should read product labels.

In addition, if you are taking medications, herbs, or other supplements you should consult with a qualified healthcare provider before taking a supplement as supplements may interact with other medications, herbs, and nutritional products. If you have a medical condition, including if you are pregnant or nursing, you should speak to your physician before taking a supplement.

Consult a healthcare provider if you experience side effects.

Source: https://www.walgreens.com/store/c/supplements/ID=360559-tier2general

independent tests and reviews of vitamin, mineral, and herbal supplements

Supplements
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Vitamin D: Get the Right Amount and See Our Top Pick – Find the Best Vitamin D Supplements

Collagen for Wrinkles? See Our Product Reviews – Choose the Best Collagen

The Best & Worst Magnesium Supplements – Avoid Magnesium Supplements With Problems

Big Differences in Turmeric and Cucurmin Products – How to Choose the Best Turmeric & Curcumin

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Which CoQ10 & Ubiquinol Supplements Are Best – Find the Best CoQ10 & Ubiquinol

19% of B Vitamins Fail Our Review. See Which Are Best. – 19% of B Vitamins Fail Our Review.

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Big Differences Found Among Digestive Enzyme Supplements – Some Enzyme Labels Won't Tell You, But We Do

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Do You Need Selenium? See Our Top Pick. – Check Your Selenium Supplement in Our Report

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Best Coconut Oil vs. MCT Oil? See How They Compare. – Find Out What's Really in Coconut and MCT Oils

Quercetin Supplements Differ – Learn Which Are Best – Best Quercetin Supplements — and at Lowest Cost

Greens & Whole Food Powders Checked for Contaminants – Greens & Whole Food Powders Checked for Contaminants

N-Acetyl Cysteine (NAC): Does It Work? Which Are Best? – N-Acetyl Cysteine (NAC) Supplements Tested

Not All Lycopene Pills Deliver — See How They Vary – Lycopene Supplements Vary in Quality and Price

Best Fish & Marine Oils – Similar to Omega-3 Prescription Drugs – How to Get the Right Omega-3s from Fish, Krill & Other Oil Supplements

Find the Best Tuna and Salmon and Avoid Mercury – Find the Best Tuna and Salmon. Labels Won't Tell, But We Will.

Taurine for Heart and Liver Disease in People, Dogs & Cats – Taurine for Heart and Liver Disease in People, Dogs & Cats

Joint Pain? See Our Top Supplement Picks – Some Problems Among Supplements for Joint Pain

Know When to Take Vitamin A and Which Products Are Best – Be Careful with Vitamin A Supplement Dosage!

Joint Health Supplements for Dogs and Cats – Choose Joint Supplements for Pets Carefully!

Few Red Yeast Rice Supplements Provide Effective Dose – Some Red Yeast Rice 15X Stronger Than Others!

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Chromium Supplements: Find Out Which Are Best – Some Chromium Supplements Contain More Than You Want

Choose the Best L-Tryptophan and 5-HTP Supplements – CL Identifies High Quality L-Tryptophan Supplements and 5-HTP at the Best Value

See CL's Top Pick for Ashwagandha and Learn What It Does – See the Test Results for Ashwagandha!

Best Valerian Supplements Found in Testing – Valerian “Sleep” Supplements Vary in Key Compounds

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Problems with 46% of Multivitamins – Particularly Gummies – New Findings for Women's, Men's, Children's & Pets' Multis

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Finding Real Ginkgo Isn't Easy – Many Fail Tests – Many Fail ConsumerLab's Tests of Quality

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Berberine and Goldenseal – Avoid Fakes! – Berberine and Goldenseal – Do They Work? Best Brand?

Is Your Oil Supplement Fresh? Flaxseed, Hemp and More – Is Your Oil Supplement Fresh? Flaxseed, Hemp and More

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L-Arginine – Does it Work? Best Brand? – L-Arginine – Does it Work? Best Brand?

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50% of Aloe Products Fail Testing – Choose Aloe Pills, Gels, and Drinks Carefully!

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Astaxanthin – Does It Help? Best Brands? – Find Out How to Get Top Quality Astaxanthin at Lower Cost

Oats Checked for Toxin and Gluten – See Our Results for Steel-Cut, Rolled, O's, and Other Oat Cereals

Only 40% of St. John's Wort Supplements Pass Tests – 20,000% Difference in Strength of Herbal Antidepressants

Greens & Whole Food Powders Checked for Contaminants – Greens & Whole Food Powders Checked for Contaminants

What We Found With Nattokinase Supplements May Suprise You – Nattokinase: Does It Work and Which Supplements Are Best?

Inaccurate Labels on 36% of Meal Powders & Shakes – Meal Replacement Products Tested and Compared

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Major Differences Discovered Among Cinnamon Supplements and Spices – Be Careful Choosing Cinnamon

See Which Vision Supplement Is Best for You – Which Vision Supplement Is Right for You?

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Source: https://www.consumerlab.com/