Scotch egg recipe

CRAB SCOTCH EGGS FOR THE WIN!

Scotch egg recipe

It's not every day Gordon Ramsay tells you your creation is worthy of a professional menu. It happened to me after our first team challenge during my season of MasterChef when I presented him with crab scotch eggs.

If you've never heard of a scotch egg, it's simply a soft-boiled egg covered in pork or beef sausage and breadcrumbs and then deep fried.

It's a popular snack in the UK, and one I hoped Gordon would consider comfort food.

Our challenge that week was to work with either a live crab or canned crab. I knew that Ryan, who was in charge of handing out proteins and didn’t me very much, would give me the canned crab.

I had never made a scotch egg but had studied them and had read that originally they had been made with a fish paste.

I was sure that if I could remove the tinny taste from the canned crab, I could successfully make sausage from it.

Check out the MasterChef clip below to see the results for yourself. My recipe is a bit of a pain to recreate (I was cooking for Gordon Ramsay after all) but it is definitely a crowd pleaser.

The good news is you can prepare the sausage and soft boiled eggs a day ahead. Store the crab and eggs in air-tight containers in the fridge. Make sure to completely cover the eggs in water, so they don't lose their shape or dry out.

Scotch eggs travel well and are perfect for a summer picnic or brunch served with a side of tangy aioli.

Work with the highest quality eggs and crab meat you can get your hands on. Check out our in-depth quality and nutrition reports to find the best brands for you. Happy cooking!

  • 6 large eggs
  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1 cup panko bread crumbs
  • 6 ounce can of fancy jumbo crab meat
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 shallot, minced
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 3 tablespoons white wine
  • 1 tablespoon fresh thyme, minced
  • 1 tablespoon fresh Italian parsley, minced
  • 1 tablespoon chives, minced
  • 2 cups clarified butter (for deep frying)
  • Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper, to taste

FOR CRAB SAUSAGE

1. To make the crab sausage drain the can and pick through the lump crab meat, making sure to remove any shell bits.

2. Add the olive oil to a pan over medium heat. When the olive oil has warmed, add the Add minced shallot and a pinch of salt and cook until translucent (about 3 minutes).

3. Add the garlic and another pinch of salt, and cook until fragrant (about 1 minute).

4. Add the crab and the wine. Salt and pepper to taste. Cook for just 2 to 3 minutes until the wine has evaporated.

5. Stir in fresh herbs and take off the heat. Cool in the fridge.

FOR SOFT BOILED EGGS

1. Place 4 eggs in a small saucepan and add enough cold water to cover them. Using medium heat bring the water to a boil.

2. As soon as the water begins to boil, remove the pan from the heat and cover it with a tight-fitting lid. Prepare an ice bath (equal parts ice and water)

3. After 3 minutes (set a timer!) remove the eggs from the pan and place them in the ice bath.

4. When eggs are cool to the touch, gently crack the shells (remember these are soft boiled eggs) and peel them under cold running water. Place the eggs in a bowl of cold water and put them in the fridge while you make your crab sausage.

FOR CRAB SCOTCH EGG

1. Heat clarified butter in a heavy pot on medium until it reaches 375. Don't work with too big of a pot, as the clarified butter should be at least 2 inches deep.

2. While the butter comes up to heat, place the flour in a wide shallow bowl and the panko in another wide shallow bowl. Whisk remaining 2 eggs in a medium bowl to blend.

3. Divide the crab sausage into 4 equal portions. Place1 portion of sausage in the palm of your hand and press it into a patty that covers your palm of your hand.

4. Lay 1 soft-boiled egg on top of the crab sausage and wrap the sausage around the egg, until it is completely enclosed. Repeat with remaining sausage and eggs.

5. One at a time, dip the eggs into the flour, shake off any excess, then roll it in the egg wash. Roll in panko to coat.

6. Fry the eggs, turning occasionally and maintaining oil temperature of 360°, until the breading is golden brown and crisp, 4 to 5 minutes. Use a slotted spoon to transfer eggs to paper towels to drain. Season lightly with salt and pepper. Serve warm on a bed of greens with your favorite aioli.

Source: https://www.everythingfood.com/recipes/crab-scotch-eggs-for-the-win

Traditional Scotch Eggs

Scotch egg recipe

Scotch Eggs are hard-boiled eggs wrapped in sausage meat, breaded and fried. Served with a delicious mustard dipping sauce, this is quintessential British fare. Who said British food is bland?

The Traditional Scotch Egg is not actually a Scottish recipe at all; it was actually born and bred in England. I have read that they were invented by the upmarket store Fortnum & Mason and a story how they were derived from the Indian dish Nargisi Kofta, but there is really no origin set in stone.

This popular British pub dish is usually served warm with a dipping sauce that can range from sweet to savory; today we went savory with a mustard sauce, which is optional, but a nice dipping sauce all the same.

Along with sausage roll and sandwiches, the Scotch egg is also a very popular convenience food sold in most grocery stores and food shops across the UK. For me, homemade is far superior to store bought and if you’ve never bought them, don’t bother, make them yourself instead. I even eat them for breakfast eggs and sausage are breakfast items after all, just add ketchup.

Just the British dialect can change around the country, some areas of England have adopted their own local Scotch egg recipes. I have yet to try the variations on this classic, but one thing is for sure, these eggstraordinary ovals of goodness are a staple in my household.

Runny yolk v’s firm yolk

Scotch eggs are also popular picnic food because they travel well and can be eaten at room temperature or even cold. A lot of Scotch eggs in pubs and restaurants and are served with a runny yolk (what is better than a warm runny yolk?)  This is achieved by soft boiling the eggs so the yolks don’t overcook when they are fried. I them both ways.

For a runny yolk: When the eggs have come to a boil, turn off the heat and allow the eggs to sit in the hot water for 4 minutes.

If you’ve tried these Scotch Eggs or any other recipe on the blog then don’t forget to rate the recipe and let me know how they turned out  in the comments below. I love to hear from my readers!

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Prep Time 30 minutes

Cook Time 30 minutes

Total Time 1 hour

  • For the mustard sauce:
  • 1 1/2 cup (192 grams) Dijon mustard
  • 1 tablespoon white wine vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon honey
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • For the Scotch Eggs:
  • 5 large eggs, 1 whisked
  • 12 ounces (340 grams) pork sausage, casing removed
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried parsley
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried sage
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 1 cup (136 grams) all-purpose flour
  • 1 cup (136 grams) breadcrumbs, unseasoned
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 1 quart canola oil
  1. For the mustard sauce:
  2. To a small bowl, add the mustard ingredients and whisk well to combine. Set aside.
  3. For the Scotch Eggs:
  4. Add the 4 eggs still in their shells to a saucepan and cover with water. Bring to a boil then turn off the heat and allow the eggs to sit in the water for 15 minutes. After 15 minutes drain and add tap water.
  5. Crack the eggs in the water and rub in the water to help to remove the shells. Dry and set aside.
  6. To a mixing bowl add the sausage meat and mix in the parsley sage & thyme.
  7. Add the whisked egg, flour and breadcrumbs to 3 small separate bowls. Season the breadcrumbs with the salt and pepper.
  8. Add the canola oil to a heavy, high-sided saucepan and fill 1/3 way. Use a candy thermometer to bring the temperature to 325°F. You can also test the temperature by adding a little of the breadcrumbs; if they sizzle it’s ready.
  9. Dust your hands lightly with flour. Take 1/4 of the sausage meat and press it flat into your hand. Take a hard boiled egg and wrap the meat around the egg leaving no gaps and shape into a tight oval. Repeat with the other eggs.
  10. Take the meat covered eggs and one at a time, dip them into the flour, then egg then breadcrumbs, all coating well. Carefully place them into the hot oil and fry until golden brown, turning once. Remove and drain onto a paper towel. Serve with the mustard sauce.

Nutrition Information

4 1
Amount Per Serving Calories 300Total Fat 21gSaturated Fat 5gCarbohydrates 16gFiber 6gSugar 8gProtein 12g

This Scotch eggs recipe was first appeared on Food Fanatic where I am a contributor.

Source: https://culinaryginger.com/scotch-eggs/

Scotch Eggs with a Perfect Runny Yolk

Scotch egg recipe

A perfect Scotch Egg has a crisp golden shell, flavorful sausage and most importantly, a soft-boiled, runny-yolked egg. This just might be the ideal portable picnic snack – that we’d be happy to eat anywhere, even the dining table. 

Every country and cuisine has its convenience food: the dish that’s so ubiquitous – it’s in the supermarket, the corner store, the petrol station – why would you ever bother making it yourself? For Britain, I think that food is the Scotch egg. A soft-boiled (or, occasionally, hard-boiled: let’s talk about that below) egg wrapped in layers of sausage meat and breadcrumbs and deep fried. 

All the component parts sound they should fit together beautifully, and indeed they do – if your recipe is good.

Too often, something goes wrong – the egg is overcooked and ends up with a chalky or green-ringed yolk, the pork is insufficiently seasoned and bland, the crumb coat is soggy.

It’s easy to throw up your hands and say, well, what can you do, it’s just a Scotch egg. And then we had a quail’s egg version at our favorite restaurant in Wales, Llys Meddyg, and here’s what happened to our minds.

OK, admittedly, we were on our honeymoon, and we had had a good amount of whisky at that point, but this was genuinely a turning point in our appreciation of the humble Scotch egg.

The outside was beautifully crispy, to the point where you could almost crack it with a knife. The pork layer was rich and tasty – I wouldn’t be surprised if it was mixed with a little black pudding.

And the egg was warm and gooey and – did I mention? – was of the teeny tiny quail persuasion. So yeah, that was a bit of magic on a plate.

Admittedly, I haven’t eaten a “native” Scotch egg in years, so I wanted to refresh my memory of what kind of quality item you might find packaged in the chilled goods section of your local Tesco Metro. So I asked my Mum.

This is what she said, verbatim. “You go to the shop, and you’re peckish and think, ooh, I really fancy one of those, so you take it home and have one bite, and then you say to yourself I really wish I hadn’t bought this, it’s absolutely disgusting. That’s horrible.” 

YES!

I don’t know why we had never got around to making our own. It’s not we’re ever short of eggs. 

Okay, so onto the recipe. Here’s how we approached these beauties. First, we wanted to make sure we cooked the eggs perfectly. We started with extra-large eggs placed in a pot with cold water to cover by an inch.

Once the water boiled, we dropped the heat to low and simmered them for exactly four minutes. When they were done, we immediately removed them into an ice bath and let them sit until they were cool – a good 10-15 minutes. And then we gently peeled them.

(This can be done up to a day ahead).

(TIP: Older eggs will be easier to peel than younger eggs since they develop an air pocket between the shell and the white, so if you have a choice of eggs, go with the older ones for this recipe.)

Most recipes for Scotch Eggs call for an all-sausage wrap but we found that can make the eggs a little greasy so we went with a mix of breakfast sausage (taken its casing) and ground pork. The ground pork is leaner and a little more coarse, so the combination is just perfect. 

The meat is then seasoned with mustard, as well as a mix of fresh herbs (you can use whatever you but we went with chives, thyme, sage and parsley).

We also to add a little freshly ground nutmeg – this adds a really nice warmth, though it’s not a crime if you leave it out. Mix the meat and seasonings well, then divide it into 8 balls.

 You can put them in the fridge while you prepare the coatings.

Crisp, golden balls of pure loveliness

You’ll need three shallow bowls for your coatings: seasoned flour, egg (with a little milk), and breadcrumbs. We use panko for almost every recipe that calls for breadcrumbs since we love the coarse texture and crispness of the resulting coating. If you prefer to use regular breadcrumbs, we recommend you look for unseasoned (i.e., without any dried herb flavors). 

Once the eggs are peeled and the pork is ready, it’s time for them to combine forces. Take one pork ball and gently flatten it between two approx. 8″ pieces of cling wrap. You can use your hands or a roller.

You’ll want to end up with a shape large enough to cover the egg, so it should be 1/4 to 1/2″ thick (and as even as you can get it without too much stress). Once it’s ready, peel off the top layer of cling wrap.

 

Roll an egg in flour and place it in the center of the sausage, and lift up the cling wrap to roll the meat layer around the egg evenly, closing up the gaps with your fingers. You can use damp hands to coax it into a smooth egg shape. 

Next, roll the covered egg in flour, shake off any excess, and dip in the egg/milk mixture to coat thoroughly, dip into the breadcrumbs to coat, and then give it one more round of egg/milk and breadcrumbs. YES TWO LAYERS OF BREADCRUMBS! This is vital and should not be skipped if you want really crunchy, crispy Scotch Eggs.

Shake off any loose crumbs and set all your coated eggs on a tray. Have another tray with a cooling rack set atop it – this is for the fried Scotch eggs to catch any oil drips.

Prepare a deep fat fryer or a medium-large (3-quart) pot with neutral cooking oil, filled with at least 3 inches of oil (but make sure not to fill it more than halfway). Heat the oil to 350ºF/175ºc. Carefully lower in two eggs, one at a time (don’t crowd the pot – you don’t want the temperature to drop too much).

Fry for 5 – 7 minutes, turning them gently in the oil every so often (we found 6 minutes was perfect). When the eggs are a deep golden brown and have mostly stopped bubbling, remove them with a spider or slotted spoon and place them onto the cooling rack.

Check the oil temperature before you add the next batch – make sure it returns to 350ºF.

Scotch Eggs can be eaten hot, warm or room temperature. (Keep any uneaten eggs refrigerated and they should last 4-5 days.) We to serve them with a good sprinkle of flaky sea salt (our favorite is Maldon) and some Quick-Pickled Red Onions. 

Follow our tips on how to cook the perfect Scotch Egg. It’s easier than you think!

Slice in half and marvel at the perfect runny yolks! This is exactly what we were after, not so liquid that they run everywhere, but gently oozing, with an almost pudding- softness. 

These Scotch eggs should stay runny even a few days later. You will be the hero of your next picnic! Well, to be honest it’ll be between you and the guy who individually punches wasps in the nose. I love that guy.

Scotch Eggs with a Perfect Runny Yolk

  • 10 extra large eggs, divided (Makes 8 Scotch eggs and you'll use 2 for the coating)
  • 1 lb. (450g) pork breakfast sausage, raw, removed from casing
  • ¾ lb. (340g) ground pork
  • ¼ cup chopped mixed herbs (chives, sage, parsley and thyme)
  • ¼ teaspoon freshly ground nutmeg
  • 1 tablespoon dijon mustard
  • Coarse kosher salt and freshly ground pepper
  • 1 tablespoon milk
  • 6 tablespoons (50g) all purpose flour
  • 2 cups (180g) panko breadcrumbs
  • Vegetable oil, to cook
  • Coarse sea salt (optional)
  1. Put 8 eggs into a saucepan, cover with cold water (an inch above the eggs) and bring to the boil over medium-high heat. As soon as it boils, turn heat to low and simmer for four minutes, then transfer eggs into a large bowl of ice water for at least 10 minutes. Peel the eggs.
  2. Add the sausage, ground pork, herbs, nutmeg and mustard to a medium bowl, season with a pinch of salt and pepper. Mix well with your hands to combine. Divide into 8 balls.
  3. In a shallow bowl, beat the two raw eggs with a tablespoon of milk. In a second shallow bowl, add the flour and season with a good pinch of salt and pepper. Add the breadcrumbs to a third bowl. Arrange in an assembly line in the order of flour, egg, breadcrumbs.
  4. Cut a square of plastic wrap, place on worksurface, and put one of the meatballs in the middle, then place another square of plastic wrap on top. Roll out or press the meat until large enough to cover the egg. Repeat process with the other balls. When ready to use, remove the top sheet of plastic wrap.
  5. Roll one peeled egg in flour, then place in the center of the meat. Bring up the sides of the film to encase it, and smooth it into an egg shape using damp hands. Dip each covered egg in flour, then egg, then breadcrumbs, then egg and then breadcrumbs. Repeat with all eggs.
  6. Fill a heavy-bottomed 3-quart pot a third full of vegetable oil (at least 3 inches deep), and, on medium-high heat, bring to 350º / 175ºC (if you don’t have a thermometer, check for when a few bread crumbs sizzle and turn golden, but do not burn, a few seconds after you drop them in). Fry the eggs two at a time, turning gently in the oil, for 5-7 minutes, until crispy and golden brown. Remove to a rack set over a sheet tray. Sprinkle over coarse sea salt while still hot. Serve with Quick-pickled red onions, if desired.

Source: https://nerdswithknives.com/scotch-eggs-runny-yolk/

How to Make Scotch Eggs

Scotch egg recipe

Scotch eggs wrapped in spicy sausage, breaded, and deep-fried to golden perfection are the perfect appetizer, picnic food or portable snack on-to-go.

How was your Easter? I hope you had a blessed and meaningful celebration with family and friends.

If you’re me, you probably had more than your fill of honey baked ham and more than your fair share of Grandma’s carrot cake. If you’re me, you probably also have a dozen of hard boiled eggs sitting in the fridge waiting for a delicious recipe.

Folks, forget deviled eggs! Make scotch eggs instead! With spicy sausage and soft yolk centers, these picnic eggs are yummy bites of heaven.

Incredibly tasty and conveniently portable, this traditional British pub food is also widely enjoyed at Renaissance fairs or family/community picnics as well as for a quick breakfast or high-protein on-the-go snacking. These savory eggs are easy to make with simple ingredients and keep well in the fridge for 2 to 3 days.

Serve them with mustard, Ranch dressing, hot sauce or even gravy for a finger food that’s hard to resist.

Tips on How to Easily Make Scotch Eggs:

  • As fresh eggs are hard to peel, use ones that are at least a week to 10 days old for easy peeling. Allow the eggs to sufficiently cool for the eggs to contract slightly in the shell. Another option for easily peeled hard boiled eggs is steaming the eggs instead.
  • To prevent an unappetizing green discoloration around the yolks, make sure not to overcook the eggs. Once removed from the hot water, drain the eggs under cold running water or submerge in an ice bath to halt further cooking.
  • Some enthusiasts prefer runny yolks but years of working in a hospital’s dietary department has scared me off from any sign of raw eggs (salmonella is far from pretty). Unless I am using pasteurized shell eggs, I find 6 minutes to produce creamy, custardy but set yolks which are not only safer to eat but also less messy to enjoy on-to-go. If you insist on runny yolks, steep the eggs in the hot water for 4 minutes or if you prefer firm yolk centers, do 8 to 10 minutes.
  • Lightly dredge the eggs in flour before wrapping in the sausage to help the meat cling better.
  • I use regular breadcrumbs to coat the eggs but you can easily swap Panko breadcrumbs for more crunch. If you want to scale down the heat and make these eggs more kid-friendly, just skip the red pepper flakes.
  • Deep-fry at an optimal 350 F to 375 F. Do not overcrowd the pan when frying to prevent the temperature from plummeting. If you’re making a huge batch, you may want to briefly fry the eggs just until golden-crisp and then finish off in the 350 F oven on a baking sheet to fully cook the meat.
  • Want a truly bite-size appetizer? Substitute quail eggs! They require a bit more work but they’re super fun to serve at parties with different choices of dipping sauces.

Print Recipe Rate this Recipe Scotch eggs wrapped in spicy sausage, breaded, and deep-fried to golden perfection are the perfect appetizer, picnic food or portable snack on-to-go.

  • 10 eggs
  • 2 pounds bulk pork sausage
  • 1 tablespoon brown mustard
  • 1 tablespoon crushed red pepper flakes
  • 2 cups bread crumbs
  • 1/2 cup flour
  • oil
  • In a saucepan, place 8 of the eggs and enough cold water to bring water to cover by one inch. Bring to a boil, uncovered, over medium heat. When water has reached a boil, remove the pan from heat, cover, and let the eggs sit for 4 minutes for runny yolks, 6 minutes for soft custardy yolks, or 8 minutes for firm yolks. With a slotted spoon,  remove eggs and transfer to a bowl of iced water. Peel eggs.
  • In a bowl, combine pork sausage, brown mustard, and red pepper flakes.
  • In a small bowl, beat the remaining 2 eggs until frothy. On a wide plate, place bread crumbs. On another plate, place flour.
  • Divide sausage into 8 balls. Lightly roll egg in flour. In the palm of one hand, flatten one pork sausage ball and place an egg in the center.  Gently press the meat around the egg to completely encase. Gently smooth the meat and mold into shape.
  • Gently roll the sausage-wrapped egg in flour, shaking any excess flour. Dip in beaten eggs and then roll in bread crumbs to fully coat. Dip again in the beaten eggs and roll in bread crumbs. Repeat with remaining boiled eggs.
  • In a pan over medium heat, heat about 3-inches deep of oil to 350 F degrees. Gently lower breaded eggs in batches of two into the pan and cook, turning on sides as needed, for about 5 to 7 minutes or until golden brown and crisp. With a slotted spoon, remove scotch eggs and drain on a rack set over a baking sheet. Serve with mustard.

Serving: 1Piece | Calories: 235kcal | Carbohydrates: 16.5g | Fat: 12.7g | Saturated Fat: 3.4g | Sodium: 223mg | Potassium: 180mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 1.4g | Vitamin A: 550IU | Vitamin C: 0.8mg | Calcium: 60mg | Iron: 2.3mg mention @Onionringsandthings and hashtag photo with #onionringsandthings

Source: https://www.onionringsandthings.com/scotch-eggs/

Sausage-wrapped Soft Boiled Egg (Scotch Egg) Recipe by Tasty

Scotch egg recipe

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Scotch Egg ~Sweet & Savory

Scotch egg recipe
Skip to Recipe ↓

Keep this simple scotch egg recipe handy when you make them for your next party, because everyone will be requesting it after they devour a few.

Happy Friday, folks! Hope you had a great week and are ready to enjoy the weekend. Any fun plans? If you’re planning a Sunday game gathering, I have an awesome recipe for you.

You see these eggs wrapped in minced meat? These are called Scotch egg, a popular pub snack in England. Or so I heard. Never been to England, so don’t quote me on that.

Anyway, I had my first Scotch egg when I was a student back in Mongolia, oh about 10 years ago. (Gosh, I feel old…) It used to be quite a popular menu item then. Since I moved to the U.S.

, I had forgotten about it until I saw it again on social media couple years ago. And it was time for me to recreate it in my own kitchen. 

Every time I make these scotch eggs, I get ohs and ahs. It never fails to impress my guests. I had served them as an entrée and as an appetizer. Perfect either way.

Traditionally, scotch eggs are deep-fried. I don’t know about you, but for me, deep-frying is cumbersome process and I try to avoid it by all cost. Instead, I brown the breaded scotch eggs on high heat first, and then continue cooking them in the oven.

This method yields equally delicious, crispy on the outside scotch eggs. The biggest challenge of making scotch eggs is preventing the meat from falling apart during cooking.

Here is my tip to avoid this problem, carefully roll the “meatballs” between your palms squeezing out the air between the egg and meat and sealing the edges.

Now let’s talk about the hard-boiled eggs for a minute. In the recipe, I asked for hard-boiled eggs, but I thought I would share a few tips here. If you are serving these babies as a dinner entrée, you’re welcome to use soft-to-medium boiled eggs. I find hard-boiled eggs are best for appetizer version, less mess and easy to grab and go.

When you hard-boil the eggs, you don’t want to end up with rubbery egg whites with greyish ring around the yolk, right? Well, here is my fool-proof method.

Place the eggs in a saucepan, add water to fully cover them and add 1 teaspoon of salt. Bring it to rolling boil, reduce the heat to low and simmer for 10 minutes for hard-boiled eggs.

Then immediately drain the hot water and place the eggs in ice-cold water to cool completely. I change the cold water couple of times.

My husband couldn’t wait for me to finish shooting these scotch eggs. He lingered around for awhile, and then impatiently reached for one mid-shoot.

Source: https://www.sweetandsavorybyshinee.com/scotch-egg/

Scotch egg recipe

Home » The Best Homemade Scotch Eggs

Scotch Eggs are truly a wonderful thing! They’re very popular in Britain and often eaten alongside a salad, or as part of a picnic. You can eat Scotch Eggs hot or cold, (I prefer just slightly warm!).

This Scotch Egg recipe has got to be the best ever! If you’ve only ever eaten shop bought Scotch Eggs, then be prepared to be pleasantly surprised at homemade ones.

They taste nothing the shop bought scotch eggs, which, I often find, taste synthetic, with an overwhelming taste of cardboard in the sausage layer.

I have no idea what they put in the sausagemeat when they do it commercially, but these homemade scotch eggs are just amazing!

Taste-wise, you get the lovely flavor of egg, and if you’re using good quality fresh eggs, the yolks will be a wonderful yellowy orange color and taste this world! The sausage meat gives you a nice meaty texture (un the shop bought ones which have no texture at all), and a nice flavor when it’s seasoned with simply salt and pepper and the other few ingredients I list below. And of course, that outer breadcrumb layer… OH, MY WORD! If you can make homemade breadcrumbs, you must! It only takes minutes to make, and it will be so worth the extra little effort!

In this recipe, I’ve added a pinch of ground mace to the sausage meat. If you’re not familiar with mace, it is part of the nutmeg family, and taste similar, but mace is slightly sweeter and a little spicier.

You can use mace for adding to desserts, some cream sauces, for example, if you asparagus and cream sauce, you can add a tiny pinch to the sauce there. You don’t need much at all, but it does enhance the flavor of food fantastically.

If you can’t get hold of ground mace, just swap for nutmeg!

I’ve also made these scotch eggs using store-bought panko breadcrumbs and they were amazing too!

Scotch eggs are traditionally served as a snack, say for a picnic, partly because they travel well without risk of getting messy during transport.

They’re also great for portion control, one of these scotch eggs is more than enough to fill your tummy at brunch or lunch time! Simply sliced in half, you can serve these for a buffet party, make ahead the day before and keep chilled until you’re ready to serve.

There are a variety of things you could serve with these scotch eggs, such as a simple salad, or your favorite chutney, one chutney we is our spicy Caribbean Mango or Pineapple Chutney, again that recipe is quick and fuss-free and will store refrigerated for a few weeks.

So here I will show you how to cook the perfect scotch egg! It’s really easy, just follow the steps as described and please do send us in your photos via our page or Pinterest right on the pin itself! We love to see your creations!

For these scotch eggs, make sure you use a good quality sausage meat, that will make a lot of difference to the taste and texture, and when you’re shaping the scotch eggs, make sure the eggs are completely covered with the sausage meat so there are no spaces where you can see the egg, otherwise they could split when they are cooking.

You can also bake these, I would suggest at around a 400F or 200 C Oven, until golden brown, about 20 – 25 minutes. I’ve also tried these in the air fryer, set at 350F 180C and cooked for about 25 minutes.

Both methods work fine, but I always prefer them deep fried.

There is something traditional about doing it the ‘old fashioned’ way by heating up a pan of hot oil and plunging those tasty scotch eggs in there!

So let’s get straight to the recipe and see how we make these delicious homemade Scotch eggs. Please enjoy!

Ingredients:

8 eggs1 lb or 450 g plain sausage meat2 tbsp chopped mixed herbs (I chives and thyme)A pinch of ground mace (see picture below if you are not sure what mace looks ).1 tbsp English mustardSplash of milk1/2 cup or 50 g flour1 cup or 100 g panko breadcrumbs, or homemade breadcrumbs

Vegetable oil, to cook

Instructions:
1. Put six of the eggs into a pan, cover with cold water and bring to the boil. Turn down the heat and simmer for five minutes, then put straight into a large bowl of iced water for at least 10 minutes.

2. Put the meat, herbs, mace, and mustard into a bowl, season and mix well with your hands. 

Divide into 6 balls.

3. Carefully peel the eggs.

Beat the two raw eggs together in a bowl with a splash of milk.

**If you are making your own breadcrumbs, I suggest about 6 slices of FROZEN bread. Cut into quarters and place in a food processor

Pulse until the bread is a medium crumb as in the photo

Put the flour in a second bowl and season, then tip the breadcrumbs into a third bowl. Arrange in an assembly line.

4. Put a square of clingfilm on the work surface, and flour lightly.

Put one of the meatballs in the center, and flour lightly

Then put another square of cling film on top.

Roll out the meat until large enough to encase an egg and remove the top sheet of clingfilm.

5. To assemble the egg, roll one peeled egg in flour

Then put in the center of the meat. Bring up the sides of the meat to encase it

and smooth it into an egg shape with your hands.

Dip each egg in flour,  then egg,

then breadcrumbs, and then dip back in the egg and breadcrumbs to give it 2 coats.

6. Fill a large pan a third full of vegetable oil, and heat to 325F, 170C (or when a crumb of bread sizzles and turns golden but does not burn, when dropped in it).

Using a slotted spoon, carefully lower each egg into the oil 

and use your spoon to turn it every so often so it browns evenly. **You may need to cook in batches depending on the size of your pan.

Cook the eggs a couple at a time, for seven minutes, until crisp and golden,

then drain on kitchen paper before serving.

We’d love to hear from you and what you thought of our Best Homemade Scotch Eggs recipe. Did you make any changes or add some other goodies? Let us know in the comments below. Thanks for reading and happy cooking!

Here are a few more lovely British recipes for you to enjoy!

Cheesy Sausage and Jalapeno Scones (so tasty!)

Festive Jack Daniel’s Stuffing Balls

English Muffins

Perfect Warm Crumpets

Welsh Cakes

British Beer Battered Fish and Chips

Classic English Scones

  • 8 eggs
  • 1 lb or 450 g plain sausagemeat
  • 3 tbsp chopped mixed herbs (I chives, and thyme)
  • A pinch of ground mace .
  • 1 tbsp English mustard
  • Splash of milk
  • 1/2 cup or 50 g flour
  • 1 cup or 100 g panko or homemade breadcrumbs
  • Vegetable oil, to cook
  1. Put six of the eggs into a pan, cover with cold water and bring to the boil. Turn down the heat and simmer for five minutes, then put straight into a large bowl of iced water for at least 10 minutes.
  2. Put the meat, herbs, mace and mustard into a bowl, season and mix well with your hands. Divide into six.
  3. Carefully peel the eggs. Beat the two raw eggs together in a bowl with a splash of milk. Put the flour in a second bowl and season, then tip the breadcrumbs into a third bowl. Arrange in an assembly line.
  4. Put a square of clingfilm on the worksurface, and flour lightly. Put one of the meatballs in the centre, and flour lightly, then put another square of cling film on top. Roll out the meat until large enough to encase an egg and remove the top sheet of clingfilm.
  5. To assemble the egg, roll one peeled egg in flour, then put in the centre of the meat. Bring up the sides of the film to encase it, and smooth it into an egg shape with your hands. Dip each egg in flour, then egg, then breadcrumbs, then egg and then breadcrumbs.
  6. Fill a large pan a third full of vegetable oil, and heat to 325F,  170C (or when a crumb of bread sizzles and turns golden, but does not burn, when dropped in it). Cook the eggs a couple at a time, for seven minutes, until crisp and golden, then drain on kitchen paper before serving.

6 6 Servings
Amount Per Serving: Calories: 236Total Fat: 10gSaturated Fat: 3gTrans Fat: 0gUnsaturated Fat: 7gCholesterol: 248mgSodium: 283mgCarbohydrates: 23gFiber: 1gSugar: 2gProtein: 12g