4 Essential Life Lessons From The Simpsons

10 Best Life Lessons We Learned From The Simpsons

4 Essential Life Lessons From The Simpsons

The Simpsons is regarded as one of the funniest shows in television history.

Despite a general belief that the series is far past it's best years at this point, there were still a long stretch of seasons where it was delivering the big laughs.

But apart from the humor the show has given us, we have also learned a lot from the show over the course of its historic run.

Through the lives of the titular dysfunctional family or the mayhem that transpires in the town of Springfield, there's plenty of opportunities for education on The Simpsons.

Sometimes it's learning the lessons along with the characters, more frequently it's by learning from the many mistakes they make.

Whatever the case, these are some of the most valuable life lessons The Simpsons have taught us.

10 Beware False Doomsday Predictions

On several different occasions, the entire town has fallen into anarchy over false apocalyptic beliefs. In the most famous event in the episode “Bart's Comet”, the town becomes convinced that a comet is heading for Springfield and will wipe out everything. The town quickly descends into chaos and begins choosing who should live or die. If only they waited to get all the facts.

9 Censorship Is A Slippery Slope

The “Itchy and Scratchy” show has always been the show's parody of over the top cartoon carnage, but it has also been the subject of some teachable moments.

In the episode “Itchy and Scratchy and Marge”, the Simpsons' matriarch sets out on a crusade to get the violent cartoon off the air, sparking a lively debate about the effects of cartoon violence on children and censorship of media.

Predictably, the show argues that cartoon violence is not the problem but also warns against letting censorship get hand. Marge's triumph leads to parents attempting to censor works of art deemed offensive. It's a valid point that continues to be topical to this day.

8 Prank Calls Never Get Old

One of the tried and true recurring jokes on The Simpsons is Bart's prank calls to Moe's Tavern. Asking for a nonexistent customer with an odd name —  I.P. Freely and Seymour Buttz — Moe calls out the name and becomes irate when he realizes the jokes that have been pulled at his expense.

Obviously, the many, many names that Bart comes up with are great fun, but the real reason the joke stays funny is because Moe always falls for it. With all the crazy trouble that Bart gets into, a nice wholesome prank call is harmless fun that never gets old.

7 Don't Be Bitter About Others' Success

As we see episode after episode the embarrassing, painful and demoralizing situations that Homer Simpson finds himself in, you might start to think that he is one of the unluckiest people alive. However, in the classic episode “Homer's Enemy,” we see Homer's life from the outside and suddenly it doesn't seem so bad.

Frank Grimes is a new employee at the Springfield Nuclear Power Plant who has worked tirelessly his entire life to reach this point. He is amazed and infuriated that a man of Homer's incompetence has reached even greater heights. This eventually drives him crazy and leads to his death, all becomes of his own jealousy.

6 Dedication Leads To Improvement

Many times in the show, Bart has been described as an underachiever and proud of it. While that might be true most of the time, sometimes that attitude has led him down a path that even he is scared of. In the episode “Bart Gets an “F”,” his dismal grades threaten to hold him back another year in school.

Terrified by the possibility of flunking, Bart actually begins to apply himself to the work. We see, for the first time, Bart's real struggles with learning and the dedication he's willing to put in. While he still flunks his test, Bart shows that he did learn and that his hard work did pay off.

5 Ultimatums Don't Work

Speaking of Bart's poor grades, they have come up a few more times throughout the series. Marge and Homer try many different tactics to motivate their son into doing better in school. Marge's tactics are generally more helpful while Homer just tries to trick him into doing well.

In “Kamp Krusty,” Homer tells Bart that he needs to achieve a C average to go to Kamp Krusty for the summer. When Bart comes home with straight Ds, Homer quickly admits his ploy didn't work and lets Bart go the camp anyway. While maybe not the best parenting, at least he owned up to his mistake.

4 Bad Things Happen To Good People

Ned Flanders is an impossibly kind and decent man. His overly religious lifestyle might be a bit creepy, but he always treats everyone with respect and does the right thing. While his beliefs teach him that such behavior is rewarded, Ned has experienced his fair share of turmoil.

In “Hurricane Ned”, the Flanders home is the only one destroyed by a terrible storm that hits Springfield. In trying to put his life back together, more and more bad luck befalls him. Ned has also seen his store suffer and he has lost two women he was in long relationships with. He seems to be walking proof that there's no rhyme or reason for what bad things happen to people.

3 Being Sad Is Alright

Lisa has always seemed the outcast in the Simpsons family. Her creative nature and high intelligence makes her very different from the rest of them, and that feeling of being an outsider extends to school as well. Lisa, while kind, is rather unpopular. All of this could lead to her feeling of depression seen in “Moaning Lisa”.

The episode deals with depression in a very honest and touching way. Lisa can't explain why she feels sad, but it's a feeling she can't escape. She is repeatedly told that she should try to cheer up and smile, only for her to realize that being sad is okay sometimes and she doesn't have to pretend she's happy when she's not.

2 Don't Take Your Soul For Granted

The soul is a hard thing to wrap your head around. There are many definitions of what one's soul is and what its purpose is, but The Simpson's might have had one of the best examinations of the soul in the episode, “Bart Sells His Soul.”

After selling his soul to Milhouse of five dollars, Bart soon finds that something is definitely missing in his life. While Lisa agrees that the soul might not have the religious connotations we usually hear about, it's still a big part of who we are and to dismiss it as unimportant is losing some part of yourself. That will make you think twice about selling your soul.

1 Sacrifices Must Be Made For The Family

Homer Simpson is not a perfect family man. He is a lazy and inattentive husband and father who makes a lot of trouble for his family. However, on occasion, we have seen examples of just how much he truly loves them all and what he's willing to do to keep them happy.

In “You Only Move Twice,” Homer gives up his dream job when he discovers the rest of the family is unhappy in their new life. Even more touching, it is revealed the reason Homer stays at his abusive and terrible job is solely so he can provide for his family once Maggie is born.

NEXT: The Simpsons Seasons 1-30 Available On Disney+ From Launch

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Source: https://screenrant.com/simpsons-best-life-lessons/

53 Life Lessons From Homer Simpson

4 Essential Life Lessons From The Simpsons

Forget Dr. Phil. Screw Tony Robbins. And don’t listen to Oprah.

The smartest person out there is Homer Simpson. After 20 years, this self-help guru is still going strong with his words of wisdom.

Don’t believe me?

Well, check out Homer’s 53 lessons about improving your life:

On Personal Development…

#1- Kids, you tried your best and you failed miserably. The lesson is, never try.

#2- Son, if you really want something in this life, you have to work for it. Now quiet! They’re about to announce the lottery numbers.

#3- All my life I’ve had one dream, to achieve my many goals.

#4- If something’s hard to do, then it’s not worth doing.

#5- If at first you don’t succeed, give up.

#6- Trying is the first step to failure.

#7- No matter how good you are at something, there’s always about a million people better than you.

#8- Beer: The cause of, and solution to, all of life’s problems.

#9-Books are useless! I only ever read one book, “To Kill A Mockingbird,” and it gave me absolutely no insight on how to kill mockingbirds! Sure it taught me not to judge a man by the color of his skin… but what good does that do me?

#10- Son, this is the only time I’m ever gonna say this. It is not okay to lose.

#11- It’s not easy to juggle a pregnant wife and a troubled child, but somehow I managed to fit in eight hours of TV a day.

#12- Because sometimes the only way you can feel good about yourself is by making someone else look bad. And I’m tired of making other people feel good about themselves.

On Advancing Your Career…

#13- I want to share something with you: The three little sentences that will get you through life. Number 1: Cover for me. Number 2: Oh, good idea, Boss! Number 3: It was that when I got here.

#14- If something goes wrong at the plant, blame the guy who can’t speak English.

#15- I think Smithers picked me because of my motivational skills. Everyone says they have to work a lot harder when I’m around.

#16- You don’t your job, you don’t strike. You go in every day and do it really half-assed. That’s the American way.

#17- Asleep at the switch? I wasn’t asleep, I was drunk.

#18- A job’s a job. I mean, take me. If my plant pollutes the water and poisons the town, by your logic, that would make me a criminal.

#19- Marge: Homer, the plant called. They said if you don’t show up tomorrow don’t bother showing up on Monday.
Homer: Woo-hoo! Four-day weekend!

On Family Values…

#20- Marge, it takes two to lie. One to lie and one to listen.

#21- Son, when you participate in sporting events, it’s not whether you win or lose: it’s how drunk you get.

#22- [Meeting Aliens] Please don’t eat me! I have a wife and kids. Eat them!

#23- Old people don’t need companionship. They need to be isolated and studied so it can be determined what nutrients they have that might be extracted for our personal use.

#24- Bart, with $10,000, we’d be millionaires! We could buy all kinds of useful things …love!

#25- Marge, don’t discourage the boy! Weaseling things is important to learn. It’s what separates us from the animals! Except the weasel.

#26- Well, it’s 1 a.m. Better go home and spend some quality time with the kids.

#27- The code of the schoolyard, Marge! The rules that teach a boy to be a man. Let’s see. Don’t tattle. Always make fun of those different from you. Never say anything, unless you’re sure everyone feels exactly the same way you do. What else …

#28-Just because I don’t care doesn’t mean I don’t understand.

#29- Dad, you’ve done a lot of great things, but you’re a very old man, and old people are useless.

On Love…

#30- You know, boys, a nuclear reactor is a lot a woman. You just have to read the manual and press the right buttons.

#31- Son, a woman is a beer. They smell good, they look good, you’d step over your own mother just to get one! But you can’t stop at one. You wanna drink another woman!

#32- What is a wedding? Webster’s Dictionary defines a wedding as “The process of removing weeds from one’s garden.”

#33- Step aside everyone! Sensitive love letters are my specialty. ‘Dear Baby, Welcome to Dumpsville. Population: YOU.’

On Finance…

#34- Oh no! What have I done? I smashed open my little boy’s piggy bank, and for what? A few measly cents, not even enough to buy one beer. Wait a minute, lemme count and make sure… not even close.

#35- All right, let’s not panic. I’ll make the money by selling one of my livers. I can get by with one.

60 cents!?! I could’ve made more money if I had gone to work.

On Philosophy and Religion…

#36- I’m not a bad guy! I work hard, and I love my kids. So why should I spend half my Sunday hearing about how I’m going to Hell?

#37- What’s the point of going out? We’re just going to wind up back here anyway.

#38- Stupid risks make life worth living.

#39- Oh, well, of course, everything looks bad if you remember it.

On Intellectual Pursuits….

#40- I can’t believe it! Reading and writing actually paid off

#41- When will I learn? The answer to life’s problems aren’t at the bottom of a bottle, they’re on TV!

#42- How is education supposed to make me feel smarter? Besides, every time I learn something new, it pushes some old stuff my brain. Remember when I took that home winemaking course, and I forgot how to drive?

#43- I am so smart, I am so smart, s-m-r-t … I mean s-m-A-r-t

#44- Oh, people can come up with statistics to prove anything. 14% of people know that.

#45- Facts are meaningless. You could use facts to prove anything that’s even remotely true!

#46- I bet Einstein turned himself into all sorts of colors before he invented the light bulb

On Civic Responsibility…

#47- Getting jury duty is easy. The trick is to say you’re prejudiced against all races.

#48- We live in a society of laws. Why do you think I took you to all those Police Academy movies? For fun? Well I didn’t hear anybody laughin’, did you?

#49- You’re not the only one that can abuse a non-profit organization!

On the Important Things in Life…

#50- Being popular is the most important thing in the world!”

#51- I’m gonna drink lots of beer and stay out all night.

#52- Alright Brain, you don’t me, and I don’t you. But let’s just do this, and I can get back to killing you with beer.

#53- I’m hittin’ the road. Maybe I’ll drop you a line some day from wherever I wind up in this crazy old world.

Take Action. Get Results.

as: Humor, Life Purpose

Source: http://www.stevescottsite.com/53-life-lessons-from-homer-simpson

Features: Essential life lessons from The Simpsons

4 Essential Life Lessons From The Simpsons
What's OnArts and EntertainmentTuesday, 12th September 2017, 7:00 amUpdated Wednesday, 27th September 2017, 11:51 amComedian Yianni Agisilaou, with Homer Simpson.

Picture: Matt Dawson Photography

As someone performing a show called The Simpsons Taught Me Everything I Know, people often ask me what, exactly, The Simpsons has taught me.

And whilst it’s not EVERYTHING I KNOW, sometimes you need to exaggerate to make your point ( the man from Nantucket).

1) Small print = big hints

From Krusty promising, “Every time you watch my show, I’ll send you 40 dollars,” (Cheques will not be honoured) to Roger Myers hailing Lisa by saying, “You just saved Itchy and Scratchy!” quickly crowned by his lawyer saying, “Please sign these papers indicating you did not save Itchy and Scratchy,” The Simpsons loves articulating the small print of deals that seem too good to be true.

2) Play to the lowest common denominator

Michelle Obama said, ‘When they go low, we go high!’ Admirable, but incorrect.

Lisa laments Bart’s populist campaign for class president, watching him incite the crowd by wiping a picture of Martin on his butt whilst screaming, “He says there aren’t any easy answers! I say HE’S NOT LOOKING HARD ENOUGH!” Bart is Donald Trump Mark 1. Sure Bart loses the election, but only because no one remembered to vote. The campaign however, was sound.

An omen of Donald Trump and Brexit campaigns to come, Mayor Quimby distracts attention from his domestic failings by shifting the blame onto immigrants in Much Apu About Nothing.

Time and again The Simpsons shows us that far from crowds being wise, groups of people are often easily led by scapegoating (Immigants! Even when it was the bears I knew it was them!), crappy ads (Mr Plow) or catchy songs (Monorail!!).

We can discuss this and much more after my show, as there’s FREE BEER AND WINE!!*

3) Be economical with the truth

The Simpsons can teach us a surprising amount about economics.

One episode particularly flush with wisdom is Bart Gets an Elephant in which Bart wins an elephant (named ‘Stampy’) in a radio contest.

When Lisa worries that the person trying to buy Stampy is an ivory dealer, Homer reassures her that ‘a guy who has lots of ivory is less ly to hurt Stampy than a guy whose ivory supplies are low’. Basic supply and demand.

Homer starts a business selling rides to neighbourhood kids for $2 a piece. Brandishing a wad of bills, he boasts, “Look Marge, $58 and all of it profit. I’m the smartest businessman in the world!” Marge replies, ‘Stampy’s food bill today was $300’ teaching us that profit involves revenues AND expenses.

Mention this article when you come along to my show to receive a 50 per cent REFUND OFF YOUR TICKET PRICE*

4) Tell people what they want to hear

In Bart’s Inner Child, self-help guru Brad Goodman implores Springfield to ‘be the boy’, meaning imitate Bart’s worldview and do what they feel all the time.

The town’s subsequent ‘Do what you feel’ festival is a disaster. The bandstand collapses because the man responsible didn’t feel bolting it, then everyone speaks overly frankly about each other and a brawl ensues.

When Homer runs for Garbage Commissioner in Trash of the Titans he makes a bunch of unaffordable promises just to get elected. When he can’t deliver them, garbage piles up and the town has to be relocated five miles down the road.

On a totally unrelated note, I guarantee anyone who comes to my show everlasting happiness, financial security and VIP entry to Heaven, Valhalla or the utopian paradise of their choice!*

When Flanders, Krusty and Apu band together to pull Homer his burning house in Homer the Heretic, Reverend Lovejoy tells him “God was working in the hearts of your friends and neighbours when they came to your aid, be they Christian (Flanders), Jew (Krusty) or miscellaneous” (Apu) “Hindu” interjects Apu, “There are 700 million of us.”

In Lisa vs Malibu Stacey, Lisa laments, “It’s awful being a kid, no one listens to you.” Grandpa concurs, “It’s rotten being old, no one listens to you.” Homer walks by and says, “I’m a white male aged 18 to 49. Everyone listens to me, no matter how dumb my suggestions are!” before opening a tub labelled ‘Gum and nuts. Together at last!’

I’m a white male aged 39. I may not have the best ideas, but everyone who comes to my show will received FREE GUM AND NUTS with every ticket purchased!*

6) The difference between jealousy and envy

In 1994 The Simpsons alluded to the definition of envy in the episode Homer loves Flanders. Rod and Todd Flanders, watching a religious cartoon listen to Jeremiah the lamb lament, “It’s not fair, my brother Joseph has a sin to confess. I wish I had a sin to confess,” to which the wise adult sheep replies “Don’t you see? You do have a sin to confess. The sin, of envy.”

Wise counsel indeed. But it was only 20 years later in 2014 in the episode Covercraft that they added much needed clarification.

After Lisa counsels Homer that he shouldn’t be jealous of Apu, Homer states “I’m not jealous, I’m envious. Jealousy is when you worry someone will take what you have.

Envy is wanting what someone else has. What I feel is envy,” which, for Season 26 is a standout line*

* Okay, I’m done with these now

In Homer and Apu, after Homer gets him fired for selling him expired meat, Apu attempts to make amends by visiting the Simpson house. Mistaking the purpose of his visit, Homer enquires on his doorstep, ‘You’re selling what now?’ Apu responds, ‘I’m selling only the concept of karmic realignment.’

In a classic Simpson move of imbuing stupid Homer with far-fetched wisdom, Homer quips back, ‘You can’t sell that! Karma can only be portioned out by the cosmos’ before slamming the door in Apu’s face. Apu, beaten, responds “He’s got me there.”

8) Why, whatever you’re doing, you should quit

Unquestionably, one of the best quotes in the entirety of The Simpsons from Season 5 episode Burns’ Heir. Having failed to convince Mr Burns to leave his fortune to them, Homer informs Bart and Lisa, ‘Kids, you tried your best and you failed miserably. The lesson is, never try.’

It’s a classic Homer quote, of which there are many if you want to convince yourself of the virtues of resignation. There’s, ‘Trying is the first 
step towards failure’, ‘No matter how good you are there’s always about a million people better than you are’, and, ‘If at first you don’t succeed, give up.’

It is, many of the best Simpsons quotes, a partial truth. Yes, trying is the first step towards failure, but also success. There are a million people better than you, but by quitting soon there’ll be two million. If at first you don’t give up, you may succeed.

It’s this ability to juggle truth, part truth and cynicism that makes The Simpsons the greatest of all shows, and the one that I chose to write a homage to.

• Yianni Agisilaou: The Simpsons Taught Me Everything I Know will be at The Stand Edinburgh on 26 September and The Stand Glasgow on 27 September, www.ycomedian.com/touring

Source: https://www.scotsman.com/whats-on/arts-and-entertainment/features-essential-life-lessons-simpsons-1439964

20 Essential Life Lessons For Happiness And Success

4 Essential Life Lessons From The Simpsons

A recent birthday got me reflecting on my journey to this age, and I'm happy to say that, compared with the younger me, I’m much more at peace with myself, content with my life, confident of what I want and sure of how to get there.

I often write about how to attain career and money success, and while many practical tips can get you ahead, your personal approach to professional and financial matters, as well as your way of dealing with your own demons, will take you to even higher heights than any amount of knowledge can.

Here are some lessons I've learned over the years. Hopefully they’ll prove as useful to you as they have been to me.

1. Know that  what you focus your mind on grows bigger.

This tip, which I learned in an incredible course called Something Different for Women (currently on hiatus), helped get me a funk and turn my life around — simply by changing my mindset.

If you constantly think about bad things in your life, your annoying coworker or a recent mistake, then she/he/it will take up a disproportionate amount of your mental space.

On the other hand, if you focus instead on your recent successes, your new goals and your fun coworkers, not only will your days be more pleasant and the irritating coworker or temporary defeat fade to the background, but the positive things in your life will grow and flourish.

Today In: Personal Finance

As the unattributed quote goes, “Watch your thoughts for they become words, watch your words for they become actions, watch your actions, for they become habits, watch your habits for they become your character, watch your character for it becomes your destiny.” Having a mind filled with negative thoughts will lead to a negative life, and a mind filled with positivity will breed a positive one.

(János Csongor Kerekes/Flickr)

2. Don’t take things personally.

Many freelance writers pitch story ideas to editors and then, if the editor doesn’t respond, immediately assume that s/he hated the pitch and hates the writer — and 99.9% of the time, the editor is just busy.

Even when people aren't busy but mean, it's not about you — it's about them. They had a bad day, a bad childhood or haven’t eaten lunch yet. I once worked with someone who was mean, but I knew she would have been mean whether I was there to be the victim or not.

 Your life will be much happier if you don’t mentally wound yourself by making other people’s actions about you.

3. Express gratitude — daily.

The first two guidelines are not easy to follow. But one habit that will smooth their adoption is taking a moment daily to acknowledge the good in your life. (Swallow any temptation to resist because you think it’s cheesy.

It takes courage to not give a damn about what others think of you and instead be sincere.) Write a gratitude list of at least five things that you email to yourself, or before dinner, have each family member say what he or she is each grateful for.

Pick a method that works for you — writing it down or sharing it with others. (Just don’t do it mentally to yourself, as the ritual won’t stick.) Expressing gratitude exercises your positivity muscle and makes it easier to remain even-keeled during bad times.

 When you get laid off, a practice of gratitude will remind you you still have your health, or if you have a bike accident, you’ll be especially grateful for your friends and family.

4.  Stand up for yourself but don’t act entitled.

There’s a fine line dividing the people who think they are owed everything and the people who are scared to ask for everything. Don’t be on either side of this line.

If you’re not sure if you’re being exploited or treated poorly, ask your friends and family or others in your line of work what’s appropriate. If you think the other party is taking advantage of you, speak up for yourself.

On the other hand, be aware when you haven’t earned something. Others will be less inclined to help you if you act as if you are owed the world on a platter.

5.  Ask for 100% of what you want from 100% of people 100% of the time.

I got this amazing advice during an incredible writing workshop held by my fellow Forbes contributor David Hochman, who learned it in David Richo’s book How to Be an Adult.

As long as you know you are not on the entitled side of the line mentioned above, being upfront about your needs and wants eliminates a lot of angst and inconvenience and discomfort in your life — and makes room for ease.

Just ask for what you want instead of wringing your hands over whether to, how to or what’s reasonable to. Unless your request is outrageous, which you should know in your gut (or from asking friends and colleagues), the worst that can happen is that the answer is no.

Reasonable requests shouldn’t damage the relationship, and if someone thinks less of you because you dared state what you need, find better people to work with in the future.

6. Learn to rejection. 

Every rejection means you’re one rejection closer to the next yes. As Hochman says, “You’ll never write for The New Yorker unless you pitch The New Yorker.” So, always put yourself out there, and get used to being rejected. No one will ever have a perfect batting average, so pile up the rejections in order to get the yeses.

7. Recognize that money gives you freedom.

I used to be interested in pretty much everything but money. If that describes you too, remember that if you don’t take care of your money, you could become a slave to debt and lack the freedom to pursue your goals.

Get a budget and learn the basics of personal finance so you don't fritter your money away on things you don’t value. (For a primer, check out this series on financial accounts, budgeting, cutting costs, and negotiating salary and raises, and read about how I manage my own finances.

) You’ll be happiest when you spend in line with your values, but doing so takes conscious effort.

8. Always negotiate. 

Every little bump in salary or fee you negotiate for yourself will mean bigger future boosts and more money over your lifetime.

 And that will make it much easier for you to accomplish your goals, whether related to your career, buying a house, getting married, sending your kids to college or traveling.

(Again, check out that all important article on negotiating.) Learn to ask for more money than you’re comfortable asking for.

9. Start investing early.

Investing early makes saving money, especially for the difficult task of amassing a retirement nest egg, much, much easier.

As I wrote in my story on investing secrets, “If Person A saves $5,000 a year from age 25 to 40 for a total of $75,000 and then never invests another penny, and Person B invests $5,000 every year from 40 to 65 for a total of $125,000 invested, assuming 5% growth, Person A will end up with more than $400,000 by retirement, while Person B will only have $256,000, simply because Person A started saving earlier, even if she put away less.” Just by starting earlier, you could have $150,000 more by retirement! This is the equivalent of someone offering you a free $150,000 right now with the only catch being that you have to wait for the money till retirement. If they did, you would take the offer, yes? Then, start saving and investing asap and make it a lifelong habit. (Read the investing secrets that will help you beat other investors, and avoid the top mistakes investors make.)

10. Do one thing at a time.

This bit of Zen wisdom is more relevant than ever. Eat when you eat. Walk when you walk. Enjoy the flavors and textures of your food. Pay attention to the feel of your bare foot on the wood floor. Don’t multitask. This takes conscious effort. Sometimes I absentmindedly pick up my phone to check just to walk from one room to another.

Flooding your mind with these distractions uses mental energy and depletes your brain power for important undertakings. Set rules around your gadget use, single task as much as possible, and appreciate the extra energy you have.

(Read here for more tips on how to decrease noise in your life and use stress to your advantage and how to perform at your peak every day.)

11. Accept and enjoy where you are right now.

Life is always changing and soon the current rhythm of your days will morph into something new. There was a period when I was upset about being unmarried, but then I realized that I might someday miss my single days. Now I make sure to enjoy every one.

12. Get a regular dose of nature.

Every day, connect with nature in some way, large or small. Even if your schedule is packed, spend a minute observing the patterns the raindrops make against your window. Watch a tree as it bends and moves with the wind. And yes, smell the roses. Studies have shown that nature has a rejuvenating effect, and appreciating it is an easy way to be present in the moment.

13. Sweep your side of the street.

Another pearl of wisdom from the Something Different course. If you have a problem with someone and need to air it out with them, first figure out what you did wrong. You can’t find a solution to the problem until you also know how you contributed to it, and they won’t make peace until you acknowledge your role.

14. Know that people who talk about other people behind their backs are also talking about you behind yours.

These people aren’t real friends. The world has plenty of non-gossips from among whom you can choose true friends.

15. Don’t hold a grudge.

In the spirit of asking for 100% of what you want from 100% of people 100% of the time, if you need to cut someone your life, do so. But holding a grudge saps your energy. (Remember — what you focus your mind on grows bigger!) So, set boundaries but don’t stew over the reason you had to establish them. Learn your lesson, then move on.

16. Always put in your best effort, so that you never have regrets or wonder ‘what if.’

Sometimes, special opportunities come along in life. Whether or not you get any particular one is not that important, because even if you don’t get this one, another opportunity will come along.

But what will leave a lasting effect is not trying your best, not getting the gig, and being left wondering, What if? Don’t do that.

Put your best foot forward so you know whether you were judged on your true merit and not a half-baked effort.

17.  Lasting change in life starts with daily habits.

If you imagine a different future for yourself, don't think that you'll suddenly shed your current life one day and become an entirely new person. What can you do now to get there? Start incorporating that into your life today.

Eventually that habit will snowball, and through a combination of persistence and luck, you'll find yourself in the life you once dreamed of. As E.L. Doctorow said, 'Writing a novel is driving a car at night.

You can see only as far as your headlights, but you can make the whole trip that way.’”

18. Ask yourself, “Will this matter in a year?”

Another Hochman gem. When you face certain decisions — i.e. taking a couple days off work to take a trip with your aging parents or turning down social events for a couple weeks to do a stellar job for your dream client — go with the course that you’ll be glad you chose a year from now.

19. Treat others with kindness and understanding.

Everyone has his or her own baggage, problems and worries, and is also striving for happiness and the freedom to pursue his or her own dreams. It’s not a winner-take-all kind of situation.

Helping someone out, being nice to them or even just smiling at a stranger will have ripple effects. If you’ve ever had someone do something nice for you, you’ve probably felt the compulsion to pay it forward, so set that chain in motion yourself.

Kindness costs little but pays rich rewards to everyone.

20. Know that  how you use your mind is in your power.

Underlying all the above principles is the fact that at every moment, you have a choice as to how to use your mind, and that, in turn, gives you control over the course of your life.

You can act with love or hate, kindness or meanness, big-heartedness or pettiness, mindfulness or absentmindedness — and the more you opt for the first of those choices, the more love, kindness, big-heartedness and mindfulness you'll have in your life.

Source: https://www.forbes.com/sites/laurashin/2014/08/18/20-essential-life-lessons-for-happiness-and-success/

4 Essential Life Lessons From The Simpsons

4 Essential Life Lessons From The Simpsons

Comedian Yianni Agisilaou is about to embark on a UK tour with his show The Simpsons Taught Me Everything I Know. So what, exactly, has The Simpsons taught him?

As someone performing a show called The Simpsons Taught Me Everything I Know, people often ask me what, exactly, The Simpsons has taught me. And while it’s not everything I know, sometimes you need to exaggerate to make your point ( the man from Nantucket).

1. Play To The Lowest Common Denominator

Michelle Obama once said, “When they go low, we go high!” Admirable, but incorrect.

Lisa lamented Bart’s populist campaign for class president, watching him incite the crowd by wiping a picture of Martin on his butt while screaming, “He says there aren’t any easy answers! I say HE’S NOT LOOKING HARD ENOUGH!” Bart is Donald Trump Mark One. Sure, Bart loses the election, but only because no-one remembered to vote. The campaign, however, was sound.

In an omen of the Trump and Brexit campaigns that followed, Mayor Quimby distracts attention from his domestic failings by shifting the blame to immigrants in “Much Apu About Nothing”.

Time and again, The Simpsons shows us that far from crowds being wise, groups of people are often easily led by scapegoating (“Immigrants! Even when it was the bears I knew it was them!”), crappy ads (Mr Plow) or catchy songs (“Monorail”!).

We can discuss this and much more after my show, as there’s FREE BEER AND WINE!*

2. Be Economical With The Truth

The Simpsons can teach us a surprising amount about economics.

One episode particularly flush with wisdom is “Bart Gets An Elephant”, in which Bart wins an elephant named Stampy in a radio contest.

When Lisa worries that the person trying to buy Stampy is an ivory dealer, Homer explains some basic principles of supply and demand, reassuring her that “a guy who has lots of ivory is less ly to hurt Stampy than a guy whose ivory supplies are low”.

While Stampy lives in the backyard, Homer starts a business selling rides to neighbourhood kids for $2 apiece. Brandishing a wad of bills after day one he boasts, “Look Marge, $58 and all of it profit. I’m the smartest businessman in the world!” Marge replies “Stampy’s food bill today was $300”, teaching us that profit involves revenues and expenses.

Mention this article when you come along to my show to receive 50% REFUND OFF YOUR TICKET PRICE!*

3. Tell People What They Want To Hear

In “Bart’s Inner Child”, self-help guru Brad Goodman implores Springfield to “be the boy”, meaning to imitate Bart’s worldview and do what they feel all the time.

The town’s subsequent Do What You Feel festival is a disaster. The bandstand collapses because the man responsible didn’t feel bolting it, then everyone speaks frankly about each other and a brawl ensues. Classic Springfield.

When Homer runs for garbage commissioner in “Trash Of The Titans” he makes a bunch of unaffordable promises just to get elected. When he can’t deliver them, garbage piles up and the town has to be relocated five miles down the road.

On a totally unrelated note, I guarantee anyone who comes to my show everlasting happiness, financial security and VIP entry to Heaven, Valhalla or the utopian paradise of their choice!*

4. Check Your Privilege

The Simpsons taught taught me to check my privilege years before that was even a thing!

When Flanders, Krusty and Apu band together to pull Homer his burning house in “Homer The Heretic”, Reverend Lovejoy tells him, “God was working in the hearts of your friends and neighbours when they came to your aid, be they Christian [Flanders], Jew [Krusty] or miscellaneous” [Apu]. “Hindu,” interjects Apu. “There are 700 million of us.”

In “Lisa Vs Malibu Stacy”, Lisa laments, “It’s awful being a kid – no-one listens to you.” Grandpa concurs, “It’s rotten being old – no-one listens to you.” Homer walks by and says, “I’m a white male aged 18 to 49. Everyone listens to me, no matter how dumb my suggestions are!” before opening a tub labelled “Gum and nuts. Together at last!”

I’m a white male aged 39. I may not have the best ideas, but everyone who comes to my show will received FREE GUM AND NUTS with every ticket purchased!*

*Not a guarantee

Yianni Agisilaou’s UK tour of The Simpsons Taught Me Everything I Know runs 6th September to 9th December. Visit ycomedian.com/touring for locations and tickets

Source: https://www.coachmag.co.uk/life/6850/4-essential-life-lessons-from-the-simpsons